Rosie Assoulin for Miss Six

When I make clothes for my girls, I usually like to switch off, follow a pattern or only make small, undemanding modifications (usually with a glass of wine in hand!). Patternmaking is hard work! I love the challenge, but it sometimes it makes my brain bleed.

I never make muslins for my girls either. Being blessed with three of them (less than two years apart), I’ve always been of the mind that if it doesn’t fit one girl, it will fit the next. This is my eldest child’s glum face because somehow the middle child ends up with a wardrobe double that of anyone else in this house. 

Middle child won’t be getting this dress though (well not immediately anyway!). I stepped outside of my kid-sewing box. I took the time to measure my child and rather than my usual slap-dashery, I spent time drafting a basic dress block that was in line with her exact measurements. I even made it up in a muslin. It didn’t take long, which makes me wonder why I’ve never done it before. Kids are basically straight up and down without any curves to throw you off kilter. 

 

I’m not going to claim that this dress was born completely of my imaginings. It’s way too cute for that. I took some inspiration from the details I saw recently in a Rosie Assoulin dress. As you can see from the photo below, the front bodice is genius in it’s pretty simplicity. I block fused the entire front bodice piece (with a lightweight, shirt-making fusible) to ensure that the top had enough structure to maintain it’s shape above the bow. I didn’t want to risk it flopping over. 

The fabric I used was leftover cotton sateen from my recent drop waist dress and I secured the back with some pretty vintage, gold-toned buttons. I recycle as many buttons as I can. These ones came from a retired Kanerva hack.


I’m really happy with this dress, but more importantly, Miss Six thinks it’s the absolute goods. I wasn’t entirely sure what she would think of having a big bow on the front of the dress, but it turned out to be quite the winner.

17 thoughts on “Rosie Assoulin for Miss Six

  1. I like the way that the back of the dress bodice leads into the front, and buttons down the back. I can see why your daughter loves it, I want one too!

  2. I just have to swoon one more time. Miss 6 looks amazing. And I’m not even joking about wanting this in my size. I’m not, please may I have one? In fact I’m thinking of possible pattern hacks as I write. I made that apples and lemons 70’s dress a while ago and it fitted amazingly. Is the upper bodice and straps scenario a difficult one? Not sure how it works…

    1. This dress is SO you! I just had a look at your two fruits dress again – It’s almost already done for you, and would look really neat with a cross back! You’d probably just need to extend the bodice up, maybe an 1.5″. I’m going to take a few photos today for you because that will be the easiest way for you to see how it’s, and the main fit issue to watch out for. It’s actually a really simple little construction – basically a back-to-front halter.

  3. Hi Debbie, been a long time follower but first time I’ve commented. Love your unique style and creative twist on modern fashion. Not sure if you are already aware of this but saw your blog mentioned in the latest Love Sewing Australia Issue 5 magazine in the Love blogs section. Great job! Love your latest dress for Miss Six, my Miss 3 may be getting a replica!

    1. Thank you so much! And so lovely to hear from you ;-). You should definitely make a little one for your Miss 3. In fact, it never occurred to me before, but perhaps I should do the same for mine!

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