Linen romper

So this wasn’t a complete fail, but I really don’t love it. I tried so hard to make it work, but still, all I’m feeling is meh…

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It’s not a complete loss though. The linen was salvaged from old makes and small remnants that I had lying around. It was incredibly satisfying to clear my scrap pile of all the lovely linens (which are too beautiful to throw away, but too small to make anything worthwhile with). If you look closely, the front and back of the shorts are actually two different blues… this make was scrapbusting at it’s finest!

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The colour-blocking was determined by the scraps I had on hand. The shorts are based on the Carolyn Pyjama pattern. I lengthened the crotch rise (front and back) by 1.5 inches in order to raise the waistline and make them suitable for a romper design.

The top half was designed by me. It’s very basic. I chickened out of the front-tie design I originally had planned. I liked the look better but the deep, deep neckline would have rendered it for beach-wear only. As it is, I may not love this make, but it will still be a practical wardrobe addition for Summer.

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Cold-shoulder dress

This dress was not on the top of my sewing queue but somehow I managed to drop everything else as soon as I spotted this Tibi ensemble. It was love at first sight sight. The fabric is to die for, but I also loved the laid-back, cut-out design of the shoulder and the loose-fitted, fluid nature of the outfit. To me, it screamed, “hot, steamy, Summer”, which is exactly what we get to expect in Kansas City.

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I used a gorgeous fluid (cotton-like) viscose that I purchased recently on whim (I’m a sucker for filling my trolley to get free shipping!). I had no idea what I wanted to use it for at the time, but it was absolutely perfect for this dress.

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The design is my own, but it was a very simple one. If you have a basic shift dress pattern that fits you well the modifications are easy. I simply slashed the length of a TNT shift dress pattern to spread it into a slightly more A-line shape (rather than a boxy shift). And then I lined up the pattern pieces to create cut-outs over the shoulder seam. I used the same principal described in my off-the-shoulder top.

This dress worked out even better than I imagined. It’s like slipping into cool cotton sheets on a hot day, which is probably going to make it my favourite dress to wear in a few months time.

 

 

Spring trends I’ve been rocking

As always, I’m sewing away most nights in front of Netflix. I don’t usually blog about my slapdash, super easy, or repeat makes. I don’t want to bore you! You’ll probably see a quick shot of them on my Instagram and perhaps some process shots on my Snapchat account (find my username: lilysageandco). My blog is generally reserved for makes and thoughts that require a few more words.

Having said that though, I’m going to share my thoughts on what’s trending this Spring, starting with:

Bodysuits and all things 90’s

Bodysuits are so totally 90’s but I kinda love them right now. I thrifted a brand new (vintage) one recently. I like them with high waist skirts but they work equally well with pants.

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The Nettie bodysuit comes to mind as a pattern to try here. I’m very close to purchasing this pattern myself.

Black on Black

Perhaps a hangover from SS2015, but this year I’m also craving a lot of black on black, including black accents with shoes and accessories.

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The Cold Shoulder

The off-the-shoulder trend is still going strong, but I’m graduating to a more wearable “cold shoulder” style. I’ve made one of my earlier makes more wearable with sewn-in shoulder straps. And I’ve been layering my white version for a fun and easy day look.

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I’m also working on a really laid-back shoulder-cut-out dress right now. Inspiration via Chriselle Lim.

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Mules, Loafers, Oxfords

A quick search online yielded these options, all of which I’d gladly add to my closet if my budget permitted.

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Frayed / Distressed Denim (and while you’re at it, denim on denim is a good option too)

This trend has been around for a while now, but I don’t think it’s going anywhere quick. We’re talking all kinds of denims with rips and tears galore. The distress-treatment can also be applied to chambray shirts, denim jackets and skirts.

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I purchased a vintage Lee denim skirt a while back (an estate sale steal) and updated it by ripping it shorter and leaving the raw edge to fray. It needs a few more washes yet (and perhaps a little help with the cheesegrater).

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I made the lace top years ago and have been gradually shortening the sleeves each Summer. It’s lived a long life.

Dress Two: #inseasonsilkcomp

I’ve been wanting to make a shirt dress for a long time and this competition gave me the perfect opportunity to do so. I was also lucky that my first dress required a lot less fabric than anticipated. In the end, I had the perfect amount for both dresses, and not a thread to spare.

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I used a vintage pattern (McCall’s 6429) which I’ve used before to make a silk playsuit. This time I followed the pattern almost to the tee. My only change was to adjust for my broad-back with a 5/8th inch wedge to the top CB (and of course adjust the collar to match this change). I also lengthened the bottom hem by about 13 inches.

The dress is of a raglan style with short cuffed sleeves and inseam pockets. The waist is pulled in with a self-fabric belt tie. The centre front is faced and most of the inside seams have been serged. I achieved smooth buttonholes on the silk CDC by using a lightweight fusible interfacing and tearaway Vilene between the facing and the fabric. I find lightweight interfacing on its own not enough to preventing buttonhole puckers in silk, and yet I didn’t want to go heavier with the interfacing as it would weigh down and affect the drape of my silk too much. The tearaway Vilene worked a treat. I imagine tissue paper could have worked too.

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The biggest challenge with this dress was the sheer length of the pieces. I’m 5″10 and the dress is floor length on me. There isn’t a separate bodice and skirt. The bodice extends all the way to the bottom hem. That’s a good 60 inches of shifty silk that I had to line up and control for each seam. My cutting mat is pretty big, but not that big!

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I’m so happy with this dress. It’s light and floaty, and it feels beautiful to wear. It’s also a very versatile addition to my wardrobe. I like it long right now, but I could potentially shorten it in the future to become an easier daytime staple. I have no problem wearing silk for school pick ups but I might need to do up an extra button ;-).

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