V9313 wrap dress in linen

This dress is already one of the favourite things I’ve ever made. I used a Vogue custom fit pattern, which has separate bodice pieces for different cup sizes. I used the A cup version. I cut a size 14 pattern as this corresponded most closely with my chest and waist measurements. Even so, I still made a few adjustments for cutting the fabric.

I added 5/8 inch to the shoulder seams on each side (as a wedge, as per my usual broad shoulders adjustment). I also added an extra half inch to the bodice length. I think I lengthened the sleeves too, but I can’t remember by how much. I also slashed and spread the sleeves by about an inch to widen them, and I cut them on the bias. Finally, I flattened the sleeve cap a little to reduce the ease. I wanted a very smooth armscye fit without much shape since I fit the bodice to sit the armscye right on the edge of my shoulders.

The pattern has great skirt options for this dress. However, I had my heart set on a gathered, midi length skirt. It’s basically just a big rectangle. As I often do, I start out by following the instructions and then get a little side-tracked with doing what I want to do. I began sewing this pattern in the same manner. The bodice is made up as per the instructons, with a fair bit of slip stitching! I lost interest in following the instructions after that so I really can’t comment on them anymore. I added a little hole in my waistband and lengthened the waistband straps so that I could wear the dress like a true wrap dress, with a tie at the back. I think the actual pattern calls for a button to secure the skirt at the front though.

The fabric is linen from The Fabric Store. I love it so much! The main stripes are a beautiful weight that really doesn’t need to be lined. The green micro striped linen is so soft and delicious that I want to make a hundred t-shirts out of it.

 

 

A Kobe Dress in Colette Dinnigan lace

My basement is currently in a bit of disarray. Unfortunately, that is where I usually sew… We’ve just had the concrete floor cut and pulled up to replace the old metal sewer pipes with brand, spanking new plastic ones. Yesterday, the concrete was poured. Today, we have a proper floor, but oh my, the dust!!! Soon, I’ll have to move everything so carpet can be put down. When the carpet is FINALLY down, I suspect I’ll take a bottle of champers to the basement to quietly celebrate in peace with my sewing equipment… for a whole weekend.

I’m currently waging a seemingly endless war against dust. But in the midst of my battles, I try to squeeze in a little sewing, even if it is only on Sundays right now. Summer break with the kiddos doesn’t help much. I don’t know why I always think I’ll find more time to sew over Summer. It never really happens.

In any case, last Sunday, I sloped off to our dusty basement (avoiding the big centre line ditch that still hadn’t been filled with concrete at that point. I slipped the drop sheets off my sewing tables and snuck in a little sewing. The outcome was a lovely lace, Kobe Dress. The pattern is one I’ve used before, by Papercut Patterns. The lace is Colette Dinnigan from Pitt Trading. The lace I used is sadly now sold out, but Pitt Trading has loads of other gorgeous laces that would do the job. My Colette lace came in panels. I used three for my version of this dress pattern, but I’m tall and I also lengthened the hem and sleeves quite a lot. I think most people could get away with using two panels to make the dress right out of the packet.

Sewing with lace isn’t that difficult. You just have to take your time. I’m by no means an expert, however, I am super happy with how this dress turned out.

To cut this lace, I knew I wanted to use the lace edge as a hem so I lined that up for the front and back. I used the entire panel length for the dress back pattern piece, and pretty much an entire panel for the front. But remember, I lengthened my dress (not sure how much by as I was most focussed on using the entire panel and lining up the hems). I’m also 5″10.  I used my third panel for the sleeves. Again, I wanted to use the lace edge to avoid hemming, so this used up most of one side of the panel. I have a little leftover lace, but no more useful lace edge left.

I finished the neckline with a narrow hem. I just took my time, basting down one fold, and then stitching slowly over the next fold. Using a walking foot helps with tension. It’s very important not to stretch the neck out as you sew, OR sew with the tension too tight. The rest of the seams in this dress are French seams. I think the fabric deserved that.

I’m wearing my Kobe dress over a black slip that is partly store-bought, and partly modified by me. It’s become one of my most important wardrobe accessories because I’m loving sheer dresses at the moment. I love this dress on it’s own, but the style also works well with a narrow belt. I’m also pleased that I spent the time on finishing it nicely with French seams. It’s a dress that I’ll probably hold on to forever.

Summer scrapbust dress in mustard linen

What do you do with all those lovely little lengths of fabric that are too small to sew even a pair of shorts, but too good to give to the kids? I usually just hold on to them and hope some inspiration comes. It often takes a very long time!

This time, I had an idea. I had several beautiful pieces of white, and mustard linen from The Fabric Store. It was leftover from these recent projects (here and here). I had my mind set on making a simple, Summer shift dress, but I wanted to test the design first. The dress pattern I used was little more than a loose sketch I made using several patterns I already own for guidance. It’s basically just two unfitted, T-shirt shaped, pattern pieces (front and back), plus some binding and cuffs for the sleeves. It’s an easy, slipover dress that will be great for throwing on over swimsuits or dressing on a hot day.

Before I could cut out any pattern pieces, I needed to create the fabric. I pieced together random lengths of linen to create a big, random design. I doubled up the white linen to give it the same density as the mustard linen (except in the shoulder area). It was fun creating the random design and quite interesting to see how they would work together in the end. Turns out that I quite like this little dress.