More Simplicity 8668 for a little winter coat

I purchased some very pink pinewale cotton corduroy from Spotlight about three years ago. Heaven knows why I bought so much of it, but I have been trying to whittle away at my supply ever since. Thankfully, it is actually a great wearing fabric and from experience, it washes well and fades little. I thought it would do nicely for a little winter coat, as long as I was able to underline/interline (what’s the right word for this, anyone?) in a better insulating material.


I used Simplicity 8668 for the coat. More recently, I’d used this pattern to make Miss Four a little ponte dress. I lined the jacket in a pretty cotton chambray that I was lucky enough to pick up as a $10 roll from Tessuti Fabrics.

 

 

This was an absolute steal. I think I have about 10m of this gorgeous chambray and it is just so versatile for a little girl’s wardrobe. I know it isn’t the best fabric for lining a jacket (particularly patch pockets!), but it was the prettiest match I had on hand.
I also underlined the jacket with bamboo wadding. Bamboo is fabulous as a fabric! And bamboo wadding works wonderfully inside jackets. It insulates well, is antibacterial, wicks away moisture, is quite light and compact, washes beautifully and holds its shape (no need for quilting it in the jacket). I purchased it from the Bamboo Fabric Store some time back. I’ve also sewn with bamboo jersey, terry towelling, and ribbed knits before and they are all just beautiful.



But back to the underlining. I wasn’t quite sure whether I should have basted the wadding to the lining or to the outer fabric. In the end, I chose the lining because I though it would make the front facing area too bulky when it overlapped. I would love some advice on this! But first, some more shots of the super cool one.


The buttons I used were from All Buttons. I’d originally purchased them for a Chanel-style jacket I was making for myself last year. I think they add a little class to the candy pink cord (you may have noticed I am doing my best to counter-pink the pinkness of the cord). I also cheated when setting in the sleeves, simply gathering them rather than easing them in. It’s a hastily made jacket, but then I didn’t want to spend a lot of time or money on something that gets worn as hard as it will on Miss Two.

The jacket is a size 4 so it swims on little Miss Two. But as long as I can see her head and hands, I am ok with this. It means she will be warm! Especially when she teams it with her new wool ponte pants (made using New Look 6016 ). I think these pants are super cool. They are unfortunately a little low in the rise for nappy wearers but I think we can get by with this for a few months until she is properly ready for her big girl undies.

 
And now for the winning pose…



A little bit of reconstruction

I’ve been coveting a cropped jacket for a while now, Burberry or Balmain preferably (I didn’t break this news to hubby before Christmas so I will forgive him for his oversight this year). But as Burberry doesn’t appear to be on my current shopping budget, I ransacked my closet to find another appropriate option. Of course, I was unable to find a cropped jacket, but I did cast my eyes over an old black jacket that I had worn a few years earlier during my pregnancy and only occasionally (out of desperation) thereafter.


It looks pretty blah doesn’t it. I like the arm length, but that was about it. The jacket itself was from an uninspiring shop, made in some type of polyester that is designed to remain crisp and last forever, but will probably end up clogging the stomach of some  poor ocean animal. It was the perfect jacket to gain confidence in making alterations whilst potentially adding a nice item to my winter wardrobe.

The alteration was simple. I measured across where I would like it shortened to, marked it with chalk, and then carefully cut across. I then made sure to restitch about 2cm on top of all the side seams so they didn’t unravel. After this, I unpicked the front placket edges so I could fold it and the hem neatly across, all the way along. I probably should have interfaced my new hem but I didn’t think of this at the time. Instead, I used fusible web under the folded fabric hem, before folding under the lining and slip stitching this all the way across about 1.5cm from the hem edge. To me, it looks neat and professional. I was most worried about not achieving a straight hem line and lining up the buttons, or misjudging the ease needed in the lining.

I also took the opportunity to study the insides of the jacket bits that I cut off, and marvel at the amount and variety of interfacing used in such a basic jacket. It’s not that I wasn’t expecting to find interfacing on the inside, but it reminded me of how clueless I used to be in my early days of sewing.

I’m much happier with my new cropped jacket. The beautiful dress is Trelise Cooper. And the little girl in pyjamas pink ballerina cat in the background is Miss Four.

The Rigel floral bomber

Oh, this Tessuti fabric just made me swoon at first sight. Kirsty from Top Notch obviously thought the same, as I spotted her lovely O’keefe skirt in it the other day. No wonder it sold out so quickly! Mine has been in my stash for some time, just waiting for that perfect project to come along. And it finally did, as soon as I laid eyes on the Rigel Bomber by Papercut patterns.


Given the unfitted nature of this bomber, I threw caution to the wind and jumped right into stitching it up. Now the sizing appeared to be working out pretty good, but I was far from happy with how the insides of this jacket were looking. It is meant to be an unlined jacket and of course, it could look wonderful as such had I given some forethought into binding the seams. But I still don’t think the internal pocket construction (with the fusing and multiple raw edges) could be tidied up to an extent that would make me happy. Or maybe it could…

So after completing the outer shell (sans ribbing), I made a snap decision to line it. Luckily, I had the perfect remnant in my stash (another Tessuti fabric), a silky, silvery viscose that just feels delightful against the skin. All I did to line this jacket was cut lining pieces of the back, fronts, and arms, sew them together, and attach the intact lining to the jacket exactly as you would the facing (according to the instructions). I then basted the free arm hem edges and bottom hem edges of the lining to the jacket fabric so that I could sew them together as one to the ribbing. It didn’t take that much more effort and I am SO delighted with the results. It has turned a rather nice bomber into a luxuriously decadent bomber. The lining adds that little bit of extra weight and warmth. The silkiness of the slippery viscose also makes putting it on over other clothes much easier.


I should also mention that I nearly doubled the length of ribbing for the arm cuffs, which by the way, is a beautifully robust double sided cotton ribbing I picked up as a remnant from The Fabric Store.

I love my fabulous new jacket! Now I just need to sew some more monotone separates or I will start giving my neighbours a headache with all the gorgeous prints in my wardrobe.