Summer scrapbust dress in mustard linen

What do you do with all those lovely little lengths of fabric that are too small to sew even a pair of shorts, but too good to give to the kids? I usually just hold on to them and hope some inspiration comes. It often takes a very long time!

This time, I had an idea. I had several beautiful pieces of white, and mustard linen from The Fabric Store. It was leftover from these recent projects (here and here). I had my mind set on making a simple, Summer shift dress, but I wanted to test the design first. The dress pattern I used was little more than a loose sketch I made using several patterns I already own for guidance. It’s basically just two unfitted, T-shirt shaped, pattern pieces (front and back), plus some binding and cuffs for the sleeves. It’s an easy, slipover dress that will be great for throwing on over swimsuits or dressing on a hot day.

Before I could cut out any pattern pieces, I needed to create the fabric. I pieced together random lengths of linen to create a big, random design. I doubled up the white linen to give it the same density as the mustard linen (except in the shoulder area). It was fun creating the random design and quite interesting to see how they would work together in the end. Turns out that I quite like this little dress.

 

A Lou Box Top in white linen and jersey

In what may become one of my most worn Summer staples, I have made myself a Lou Box Top. It’s such a quick and easy sew.

I used white linen for the front of the top and lovely, cotton jersey for the back and neck binding. Both fabrics are from The Fabric Store. The linen is lightweight. I love the weight of this linen for a blouse. It’s not really sheer at all, but it does have a lightness about it. It would probably need a lining if I was making a skirt or dress. The cotton jersey is a pure cotton, and so soft. I really like the way the two different fibres and textiles pair together; cotton, linen, knit and woven.

I made a minor change to the pattern, simply lowering the armscye about 1.5 inches. Next time, I may add a little more to the shoulde seams at the neckline. It feels borderline too wide and I think I can still get away with making the top as a pullover if I shrink the neck a little. I have one other idea that I plan to try out on my next batch of delicious linen. Oh, did I not tell you, this is going to be my Summer of Linen…

 

An updated drop waist dress in printed linen

I made a bunch of drop waist dresses several years ago. I absolutely loved them. Two are still in very good condition. They just feel a bit outdated to me, so they have been packed away for another time (or for when my girls become teenagers and want to explore all the old clothes I used to make and wear).

I used the old pattern that I drafted for myself years ago. Sorry, there isn’t a pattern for this, but it is far from complicated. I used French darts and a slightly A-line shape to the dress bodice. I like French darts for this style as then blend in nicely with the A-line shape. The bodice has a hi-lo curve to it, and the gathered skirt is a little longer than I’ve used in the past. I also modified the shoulders to create ties instead of fixed seams.

The linen fabric is from The Fabric Store. It’s such a lovely, fresh print. And for those of you who like to wear linen, but have trouble with the delicious crinkles, I’d suggest you try a printed linen like this. It still wrinkles like linen, but the print kind of disguises them.

This will be such a cool and comfy dress to slip on during hot, summer days. I’ll probably wear it most over bathers, on trips to the pool, or outdoor swim meets.

Tessuti Skylines Competition

I had it in my head that I wanted a floaty, ruffly, backless, maxi dress. The challenge was in producing a dress that wasn’t too girly in such a (potentially) twee fabric. The fabric is really, very beautiful though. It’s a linen blend, with a lovely, crinkly texture that becomes more apparent after washing. I’m not one who likes my linen crisp. I love the way linen fabric creases and crinkles.

The design is my own, but I’ll talk you through it a bit. I honestly believe that if you have a couple of different well fitting bodice patterns in your stash, you can make virtually anything from them. This started off as a standard princess-seamed bodice that I had draped to my shape months ago. I modified the design to remove the shoulder seams so I could attach straps instead. I also lowered the back to not much more than an inch above my waist. And I lowered the back waistline to create a slightly hi-low look at the waist seam. I further exagerated the hi-lo effect in the first skirt panel, but kept the last gathered, skirt panel as a very long rectangle.

The bodice is detailed with bias binding that I cut as one inch strips and left the edges raw. I love the slightly frazzled look of well-considered, raw edges in fashion right now. I seamed these into the princess seams, the waist seam, and on either side of the back zipper. As they are cut on the bias, they shouldn’t really fray too much with wear, however I am looking forward to them looking more pronounced and “ruffled” after a few launderings.

To help keep up the weight of the skirt, I added a waist stay to the dress. This is basically a soft petersham ribbon handstitched at points along the waist. I cut up an old bra for the closures. I used the cups from this same bra to add a little shape to the front of the dress. I toyed with inserting the cups properly under the lining before I attached the skirt, but I think they may annoy me down the track, in which case I can still easily remove them.

I can tie the back in a few different ways, but my favourite is the backless version you see in the majority of the photos.

 

I’m very pleased with how this dress turned out. It’s a fancy dress, made from a very down-to-earth fabric. I love the contradiction in this. It’s something that I would feel very comfortable in dressing up to wear to an important occasion.

 

 

Burdastyle paper bag waist pants

This was one of those projects that I made at a completely inappropriate time. I made them about four months ago, just as the Winter weather was starting to kick in. I still haven’t worn them. It’s not because I don’t want to though. Loose linen pants just cannot be equated with a Kansas winter, inside or outside. It’s still far to cold to wear them (-11C today) but I can now see Spring on the horizon, which is possibly why I finally found the inspiration to take some photos. They will make the most delicious Spring pants ever!

Remember the military green shorts I made at the end of Summer? I used the same Burdastyle (111A) pattern for these. I made exactly the same adjustments, but just refined them a little. I shortened the top ruffle by about one inch. It was just a smidgen too high in the shorts. I love the drama of the shorts (and will still wear them) but a too high ruffle flops down a bit by the end of the day. Perhaps a bit of interfacing would help this out though.

Like the shorts, these are also made with beautiful milled linen from the Fabric Store. The shade of pink is so pretty. There’s a lot of pale pinks coming out in Spring RTW right now. Perhaps that’s influencing me a little with colours. I do like a good neutral though.

Honestly, I can’t remember if I lengthened these pants or not. I may have (I usually do with everything), but I do remember cutting off some at the end as well. I think the pattern is designed to be very long in the legs.

On another note, I haven’t really been in a position to sew much over the past six months but I think things are slowly changing. I purchased and printed an Oslo Coat last night. I’m hoping to get it taped up and ready to cut by the weekend. There’s a good three months of coat weather left here, so I I think I’ll sneak it in just in time. For my Australian friends, Spring in Kansas is generally colder than a Sydney Winter, with the odd bit of frost and occasional snow dustings.

After this, I’m planning on making the new dress pattern by Tessuti Fabrics. How lovely is the Claudia dress?! I was smitten the moment I saw this one. I’m hoping to find enough linen scraps in my stash. I have a feeling I may need to get a little creative though. What’s in your sewing queue? Are you still sewing for Winter (or Summer, my friends downunder)?

Burdastyle paper bag waist shorts

These are my new favourite shorts. I need more of them. In linen. A pants version. A whole closet full would be nice.

The pattern is Burdastyle 111A shorts style. I made a few small modifications.

  • I omitted the front fly (might have been a faux fly…)
  • I also ommitted the belt carriers
  • I stitched down the facing and created an elastic casing as I did this. The shorts do not include an elastic waistband, but I wanted a pair of easy, comfy shorts that could be pulled on (as well as tied up with a big bow!).

I love my new shorts. The linen is from the Fabric Store; a most divine shade of Military Green. I love the exagerated paper bag waist of the design. I’ve been wearing them with a silk tank I made ages ago. The very pretty charmeuse is an oldie from Tessuti Fabrics. I can also see myself wearing these shorts with a billowy, white linen top in Fall.

 

BHL Orsola dress in mustard linen

I’m excited to finally get to share my Orsola dress. It’s By Hand London‘s latest pattern release.

The Orsola dress is a true wrap dress. I sewed mine up in a beautiful linen from The Fabric Store.

I made a few small modification to my Orsola dress. I graded between sizes, sewing one size larger through the bust and blending to a smaller size through the waist and hips. I lengthened the bodice by 1/2 inch and the hem by 4 inches.

The bodice in the dress pattern has bust darts and waist darts. I’m an A-cup bust on a good day so I removed the bust darts, just keeping the waist darts for shape. It worked perfectly.

After toiling the skirt, I also removed the front darts. My body is angular rather than curvy and I didn’t need the extra fullness through the hips that the front darts provided. I also skimmed a few mm off the upper hip curve, just to reflect my shape better.

The result is a super comfortable and elegant dress that I’ve been wearing a great deal. It fills the ‘smart casual’ gap in my wardrobe perfectly. If I had more linen in my stash, I’d be inclined to sew up another!

 

Vogue 8952 – View B in a linen knit

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I don’t like sewing staples very much. However, I had a bit of linen jersey in my stash and thought it might make a nice top for Fall.

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I used Vogue 8952, and made View B in a size 12.

I made a few very small changes to the pattern:

  • I narrowed the waist/hip flare.
  • I *think* I shortened it a little too. I wanted a simple, long sleeved top rather than a flared (borderline) tunic.
  • I lengthened the sleeves by an inch.
  • I also attached the funnel neck a little differently. I doubled it over, rather than leaving it as a single hemmed piece. I didn’t want quite so much drape around my neck.

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I don’t mind the way this top turned out. It’s not perfect, but it is perfectly wearable. The neckline is more stretched out in my top than what you’d normally see (even though I did stabilise it). I should have adjusted for my broad shoulders/back (as I would normally do if I were sewing a woven fabric). The neck seam should probably sit a little further in towards my neck on each side. However, I knew that the type of knit I was using, and the wide nature of the neckline would be very forgiving to broad shoulders. And it is comfortable to wear so I can deal with it.

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White Esthers and a knit raglan

There’s never any fabric waste in my house, especially when it’s something as lovely as this Saratoga knit by O! Jolly!. I only had the tiniest amount left after finishing my Megan longline cardigan, but I knew exactly what I wanted to do with it.

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I used the raglan view of V8952 as a base for the top. I made a few fit modifications, raised the neckline, and added my own neck and hem bands. I used some plain white ponte for the back and sleeves, and seamed together three scraps of Saratoga knit for the front. I love the texture of the spongy knit as a feature and the contrast of cream against white.

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The shorts are an old favourite and TNT for me. I used the Esther shorts pattern and simply added an asymmetrical overlay at the front. I used scraps for this make too. I salvaged some gorgeous, meaty Theory cotton sateen (from this dress) to use for the back of the shorts and for the front overlay. The dress was tired (with a few stains) and needed to be retired. I didn’t have quite enough sateen though, so I used some scrap linen for the shorts front and overlay lining. The linen was too lightweight for the shorts on its own, but perfect for this design where the front is layered.

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I’ll wear these shorts a lot. I made a yellow version a few  years ago which are still on the go, but have been downgraded to gardening/painting gear. It feels good to replace a wardrobe item that was very much loved.

 

Vintage lace cold shoulder ensemble

You’ve seen me sew up a few cold-shoulder garments this season. I love them! I particularly love this style because it is cool, loose-fitting, and not at all restrictive. It’s become my go-to style this Spring.

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The fabric came from a vintage, linen tablecloth. Beautiful linen tablecloths are at every estate sale here in Kansas City. I’d like to say, “a dime a dozen”, but they are never ever a dime. They are usually priced anywhere from $10 to $150. I loved this one as soon as I saw it, but I wasn’t prepared to buy it at full price. So I crossed my fingers and went back to the sale on the last day and bought it for $40 (50% off). It’s a huge tablecloth (2m by 4m) and the linen is of a beautiful quality, without any stains or tears. It is densely woven, with a fine texture, and quite opaque, but still lightweight enough for garments. In  my opinion, it was a steal.

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I didn’t stop at the top though. I also made myself a pair of matching shorts, inspired by the one and only Sophie (Ada Spragg). I still have a lot of leftover fabric. This is the tablecloth that never stops. And the best bit about it is the very ample lace edging. I love the look of the lace, but I also love the fact that incorporating it in as the hem of a garment makes for a very quick sew (no hemming!!!).

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