Simplicity 4192: AKA my happy pants


I took a bit of a gamble the other week and ordered some cotton voile online from Hawthorne Threads. I’ve never ordered from them before and I was half expecting to open up my parcel of beautiful prints, only to be disappointed with the quality of cotton they’d been printed on. This is by no means a slight against Hawthorne Threads. It’s just me recognising the fact that shopping online for fabrics can be risky if you aren’t familiar with the vendors.

Well, I can’t even begin to describe how delighted I was when I opened up my little parcel of pretty. The quilting weight cottons were as exactly as expected, but with a nice feel to them. The Art Gallery voile blew me away. It is the most beautifully light and silky cotton, not too dissimilar in feel to a tana lawn. This little bundle has certainly warmed me to Art Gallery Fabrics.

I made these pants to wear with my white linen, cross back tunic. I figured my wardrobe was in need of a little colour. I purchased the pattern before I found the fabric. It was Miss Oona of the one and only Palooza that pointed me in the direction of Simplicity 4192.  I saw her pretty voile version and quite simply had to have them for myself. I’m still hunting for some matching Kalkatronian bling, but in the meantime, just look at all that lovely overlapping leg fabric. I love the way they flare in the wind and when I walk.
 
 
 
 

 

Simplicity 4192 is one of those rare patterns that you really can’t go wrong with. The style is a wrap pant, so the fit is pretty much guaranteed to be perfect. They tie at the front and the back and are very simple to sew. They suit pretty much any lightweight woven fabric. I used a cotton voile, but I could see them working well in a silk CDC too.  


I sewed a straight size 12 and made no modifications to the pattern at all. The pattern suggests they are designed as full length pants to be worn 1″ below the waist. That would be your natural waist they are talking about, so for most people, the pants would rise to just about belly button level or slightly above. I was after a slightly cropped length with a moderate rise so being tall of both body (and crotch) the pants worked out perfectly for me. A shorter lass may have ended up with the waist around her armpits.

In any case, I love my new pants and I will definitely be classifying this pattern as a keeper.











  

Vogue 8805: linen and lace

I’m not quite sure where this dress came from. I actually pulled out the remnants of white linen and cotton lace (both from Tessuti) to make a dress for one of my daughters. Well, that obviously didn’t happen!

I love linen. I love the crinkles and the way it shimmies and ripples as it moves. It is the coolest, most comfortable fabric in summer. Usually, I can’t get enough of it, but the year before last I overdosed. I do that sometimes. I have a sneaky feeling that I am about to overdose on white this summer…

I’ve used this pattern several times already (hereĀ , here and here). This time I played around with the sleeves a little. I also widened the neckline, ditched the back closure, lengthened the middle panel and curved the hem a little. It’s a simple, yet comfortable and cool summer dress. I love it. Miss Four says I look like an angel in it. I can live with that!

Swishy skirt photo update

This little swishy skirt was one of the very last things I made before leaving Australia. I gave it to Miss Six last week for her birthday.
 
You wouldn’t believe just how many panels I had to stitch together in order to construct this skirt. The white linen was upcycled from a pair of too-tight linen pants. The blue linen and Liberty of London were merely scraps.


It is was the easiest skirt to make, really just several gathered rectangles and a folded, elastic waistband. I usually try to calculate at least 2x waist width (or skirt panel width) for the skirt (and ruffles). I find this gives a good amount of volume swish.

Two little scrappy skirts and a pair of matching bike shorts

So this is it, my very last Australian make…for the time being at least. It’s amazing what you can do with scraps, and silk crepe de chine no less! You might recognise the fabric from my recent Meissa. But I think it also works perfectly as a swirling, twirling, ballerina skirt.

 

I only had awkward lengths of bias cut silk from a previous disaster to work with. The best I could do was gather two very odd skirt pieces and then layer them together. The great thing about making little scrappy pieces like this is that I don’t feel scared of experimenting. I’ve shamefully only been using one or two stitches on my serger. So this was a great opportunity to discover how ridiculously simple it was to make nice, neat, narrow and rolled hems on the serger.

I used my last bit of viscose jersey (from here) to make the waistband, with just enough left over to make a pair of matching bike pants for her handstand sessions.

 
 

And finally, here is a little teaser that I upcycled from a pair of white linen pants. I’m going to smuggle it to Kansas for Miss Five for her birthday. More photos to come.



V8840 in cropped linen and a repurposed skirt

Let’s start with the skirt. You might remember my white linen dress from earlier this summer. I literally wore this dress to death. In the end, due to several small tears at strain points in the bodice (and coupled with my collar mishap), I decided it was time to revive this dress as a maxi-midi skirt. All I did was unpick the bodice slice along the seam line with my rotary cutter, add a back seam for the invisible zip and construct a WIDE waistband (I still need to sew another hook and bar to the back of it).


The top is a simple return of Vogue 8840. I used some amazing linen from Tessuti Fabrics. I actually feel a little guilty about this top. I envisioned those gorgeous stripes in a cute little pair of shorts for my littlest girl (the one who is happy to NOT wear pink). But I think I can get over the guilt. I LOVE this top. It is light and cool and in one of my favourite summer fabrics. I think it looks pretty neat with the skirt too.


The modifications I made to V8840 in the long version (size 12) were:

  • cropping the length by 29cm
  • took 2cm off the neckline, front and back
  • stitched the back seam all the way
  • adding facing instead of binding, and an invisible zip centre front

Drop waist version three

I know I said that I was finished with this style of dress, but here is yet another one. I could make excuses, but quite frankly, I just love this style right now. It has shamelessly become my summer uniform. Anyone who sees me on a regular basis will know that I am simply alternating between my two current drop waist dresses (here and here) each day, so I feel it is only fair to them that I add another to the mix.

Now the main reason for the lack of variety in my wardrobe is that I have already sent most of my clothes to Kansas ahead of me. I wasn’t planning on making any more summer frocks before I go, but this was an act of sheer necessity.


I used a lovely remnant of black linen from Tessuti Fabrics. The construction was simple, a basic bodice with two long French darts and a simple ruffle skirt, exactly the same as my last two efforts. So now, I have tested this dress in a cotton knit, a heavier weight woven, and now linen. I love them all! And I’d say to all my friends, let me go with this drop waist obsession this season, but if I still have this style of dress on rotation in six years time, please someone, sit me down for a serious chat…


 

Festive fever

I made this little dress a few months ago, just before I started blogging. It was only recently unwrapped on Christmas day and I am happy to say that it was met with a big smile. Miss Five did comment on the fact that Santa must have pinched some of my fabric, but for some reason, this all seemed within the realm of normal to her. I think dresses will have to be a gift from Mummy rather than Santa next year if I am to keep this Christmas dream alive for as long as possible.

 
Isn’t it positively festive?! I used a pattern from one of my Japanese pattern books. The same dress is actually pictured on the front cover. However, I did raise the front neckline by a few cm.


The fabric I used is a gorgeous printed linen from Tessuti Fabrics. I fell in love with this fabric the moment I saw it and probably purchased a little more than I needed. I have made it into a fabulous pair of pyjama pants for myself (V1347 Chado Ralph Rucci), a skirt for Miss Two, and a dodgy lampshade (that we won’t speak too much of).


Hubby doesn’t particularly like the fabric base colour. He calls it ‘wholemeal’. I can see his point, but I still love it.

And so does my pretty little butterfly. But keeping her still for these photos on Christmas day was no mean feat!
 
 
 


Upcycling Nan-Nan’s skirt

My mother-in-law had a lovely cotton lace skirt that had worn out in the waistline but was otherwise in beautiful condition. The fabric was so pretty that she thought I might be able to do something with it. I wish I had taken a photo of the original skirt as well as the process I followed as it turned out wonderfully, albeit a fraction too large as it was originally intended for her bigger sister.

 
 

The skirt started out as a large, lined, knee-length circle skirt with a ribbed stretch waistband. The lining and waistband were useless but the cotton lace was lovely, even though it was mostly on the bias. All I did was cut off the waistband following the same circular waist shape. I left all the side seams intact. However, I did cut down the centre-back so I could add a zipper to the dress I was planning. I then gathered the basically intact skirt, added a simple gathered lining and whipped up a basic bodice out of a scrap of pale blue linen I had on hand. There was only a skerrick of lace remaining so I added this as overlay to the back of the bodice. In the original skirt, the lace edges were left unfinished and slightly frayed, so I kept this feature in the dress too.

And this is the result, absolutely fabulous for swishing even if I do say so myself. Miss nearly-Four claimed the dress and I think her Nan was quite chuffed to see how her skirt had been repurposed.

 
 

A beaded linen Hannah top

What does one do when on holidays? Why they practice their beading of course! I am the kind of person who finds it very difficult to be idle. I can’t simply sit and watch a movie (to the despair of my ever tolerant husband). If one does find me ‘watching’ a movie, I will most likely also be cutting fabric on the floor, stitching on buttons, or have a book of some description in my lap. I NEED to be doing things, plural. So in the absence of my beloved sewing machines, I packed up some precut pattern pieces, beads, sequins, and loaded my Kindle with Beading Basics by Carlita DelCorso and happily set off on holidays with my three little shadows in tow.

I did discover that my five year old shadow is somewhat of a thrill seeker, as she braved her first rollercoaster rides and ghost trains at Movie World on the Gold Coast. But that it another story entirely. Big rides are not my cup of tea. Give me a needle and thread any day. And even better if it comes with sequins!


This is my second Hannah top. My first one worked out beautifully in some silk crepe de chine. I made this Hannah up in a remnant of simple grey linen that I picked up from Tessuti Fabrics many moons ago. I interfaced the entire front piece, knowing that I was planning to bead it while I was away, but not knowing exactly what I had planned. I also nipped the sides in a fraction and decreased the bust dart a tiny bit. I used a lovely vintage button to fasten the back, from All Buttons.

 

My beading and sequin application was intended to be quite random. I wanted it to look like someone had splattered the front of my top with sparkles and it was just dripping down. Well this was the idea. I actually had no idea just how many beads and sequins such a vision would require, so this was a fabulous learning experiment for me. What you can see on my top is about 8hrs of sewing, half a small packet of sequins and 12.5g of seed beads. It really isn’t a lot. I would have kept going down the top with the gorgeous little seed beads but I finished the tube while I was away and by the time I got home, I was just keen to get sewing.


I’m pretty happy with the way it turned out. I feel very glam in my sparkly new top and I love how the big gold sequins contrast with the natural crinkliness of the grey linen. I also learnt a lot just by getting in there and sewing on beads, as well as by reading Beading Basics along the way. The book, by the way, is a great simple introduction into sewing beads on fabric. The pictures were a bit average on my Kindle but the content was still good. I would recommend this for anyone, sewers and non-sewers, who might like to embellish clothes in their own wardrobe, or pretty up some of the fabrics they already sew.

Now that I have all my sparkles ready for the festive season, roll on those Christmas parties! Well, roll on the carol nights and sticky picnic fingers at the very least…


Liberty and linen peplum

Now I fully realise peplum is a little last season, but it is such a flattering style and I had been wanting to make myself a peplum top for a very long time.

I delved into my stash for this project, using the last of my Liberty from Coco’s recent playsuit and a little leftover linen from another project. The linen was from Tessuti Fabrics and is really quite special. It is a coated linen and the grey is actually printed on. It looks and feels amazing.

The design is my own. The top is self-faced, with an invisible zip centre front. It is probably a little looser fitting than it needs to be, but I was aiming for comfort and coolness with our long hot summer on the way.