Drop it for the skirt

Can I call this a drop waist skirt? Well, if I can, it’s so totally me! I made my first version of this skirt up a few weeks ago and I’ve been loving it to pieces ever since. This time, I jazzed the pattern up a little by adding a couple of cute front pockets. I also found a way to use up some completely and utterly amazing fabric scraps I had lying around.

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The way the skirt hugs the hips, and the addition of the front panels makes this skirt so much more flattering than a basic, gathered skirt. Here are some shots with a simple white top, which show the details of the skirt more clearly.

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In real life, I’ll be wearing it with my favourite stripes, which is the main reason I designed that top in the first place.

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A different kind of maxi skirt

So this skirt is the final chapter of my denim on denim story. My denim shirt is blogged about here. The skirt itself, is a very simple, self-drafted number. I used my pencil skirt block (seen here as a neoprene and faux leather mini) and simply shaped the bottom hemline to be high at the front and low at the back. I then gathered a large rectangle of beautiful
Tessuti linen into a skirt. The effect is a drop waist in a skirt. I love the subtle hi-lo hem, and my love of a good drop waist needs no further explanation.

 

A second scrappy Christmas skirt

This is my last little Christmas gift catch-up post. It’s another scrappy silk skirt, made in exactly the same way as the one in my last post. This is also the last of my beautiful butterfly silk CDC (which you’ve now seen more times than I care to remember).
 

 

And the best thing about this skirt is it’s swish-factor.
 



One scrappy Christmas skirt

I keep most of my little silk scraps because they make such beautiful swishy little skirts. Mostly, the scraps are all off grain, and in awkward shapes and lengths but this doesn’t matter one bit. I just hem the edges, gather the pieces, and then layer them randomly until a skirt is formed. The waistband is just a length of elastic, encased in a fabric waistband.

I made this skirt with leftover Cracked Glass CDC from my Summertime Anna, Chanel-inspired ensemble, and little birdie polyester dress.

 It’s a very swishy skirt!

But now I must take my handbag and go Mummy.

Kwik Sew 1034: Refashioning Daddy’s Ralph Lauren sweater

This great little sweater actually started out as one of Daddy’s big Ralph Lauren sweaters. There wasn’t much wrong with it in the first place, but he kept wearing holes in one of the elbows. I darned it a few times, but on the last occasion, it was either an elbow patch or a complete refashion.

 

 


I used Kwik Sew 1035 to make a sweater out of it for Miss Six. It was an incredibly quick and easy sew because I utilised the existing knit waistband and arm cuffs instead of sewing my own. I cut away the holey parts of the sleeves and added contrast bands of a different wool knit. I was even able to conserve the little Ralph Lauren Polo horse in cutting the front bodice, but only just!

 
 
 
 
The skirt she’s wearing is the bottom half of an Oliver + S Hide and Seek dress that I made a while back. The dress accidentally snuck into a hot wash with towels and the wool portions of the sleeves and bodice shrunk. All I did was to cut off the bodice and add an elastic encased waistband. The change turned it into a simple A-line skirt with fabulous side welt pockets. It’s actually become one of her all time favourite pieces (as you can probably see from the wash fade and wrinkles). I will purposefully make this modification of the pattern again in the future now.

Neoprene and faux leather mini skirt: two ways

 

This simple, high-waisted, pencil skirt is made up in neoprene, with a panel of fleece lined faux leather for the hem band. I added a little square of faux leather to the waistband and turned the back zipper into a design feature. The pattern I used is my own design, but I did a quick online search and you could just as easily modify M3830 to make this for yourself.

 

 

 


This is about as mini as a skirt gets for me. I’m still liking the high waist look but I’m also starting to feel more of an inclination towards dropped waistbands. Perhaps these mixed feelings are why I like this little skirt so much. I’ll most likely wear it with one of my favourite Simplicity 1366 makes as soon as the weather warms. For now, I will be layering it with a turtleneck skivvy and making the most of that high waist style.

 
 
 
 

Just another twirly skirt

There’s not much to say about this skirt. It’s simply made by layering panels of gathered polyester chiffon to a waistband. The fabric was chosen by one of my girls when we were shopping at Jo-Ann, although I’m still not sure what possessed me to purchase it…perhaps my daughter’s big blue eyes, or maybe it was the $3/yard price tag.

 
 

 
 


I’m pleasantly surprised by how this skirt turned out. I can make my girls the coolest culottes and tops, but the thing that lights up their faces the most is, without fail, the simplest of gathered skirts.  

 

A denim midi skirt

Here’s a little self-drafted number that I’ve been working on for a few weeks now. You might have seen some of my sketches on Instagram as a part of Bimble and Pimble’s #bpsewvember, which by the way, is the best idea ever. I’m really loving everybody’s sewing pictures.

In addition to taking part in Sewvember, I’ve also been trying to challenge myself a bit more with my sewing. To me, this means planning, drafting and draping more of my own designs, and reading up more on construction and design. I’ve made it my goal to slowly work my way though a pattern-making textbook I own. However, I’m not moving very fast because I keep getting distracted with makes like this instead of learning the fundamentals! But I’m still discovering new tricks and flexing my brain, so I’ll let myself off the hook.

 
This is the midi skirt in denim that I’ve been dreaming about lately. I’m really proud of the way it turned out. The side pockets with the white denim and faux leather detail are small but still functional. I like the way they are shaped down the side of the body. I used a white zipper to match the panels and recycled an old brass belt buckle to make the waistband fastener out of faux leather.
 
 
 
 
 

There are two small box pleats in the front of the skirt and two larger pleats in the back. I wanted a pencil-ish shape to the skirt, but with enough ease and volume to look casual and feel comfortable. The hem is asymmetrical and the addition of the front white panel was last minute. Sometimes I need to visualise how garments are turning out (when they are half made already) to figure out what extra little touches are needed. I block fused the front panel of white denim with some lightweight woven interfacing to give it a bit more body. The white denim isn’t as heavy as the blue denim and I wanted it’s drape to match the rest of the skirt. I’ve been discovering the almost limitless potential of good quality interfacing recently which I’ll probably be talking about more in a coming post.

 

 




Simplicity 1366: oversized hack in white denim with a shoulder seam zipper

I just can’t stop with this Cynthia Rowley pattern, Simplicity 1366. It is seriously the most perfect blank canvas. My other makes of this pattern are here, here, here, and here.

For this version, I made the following changes:

  • dropped the shoulder seam by a further inch
  • added an extra inch to the neckline side of the shoulder seam
  • dropped the bottom of the armscye by about 1.5″
  • added a feature zip to a shoulder seam
  • made some wide bias binding for the neckline, folded it over, stretched it slightly and attached it like I would a knit neck band
  • lengthened the arms to extra, extra long. I wanted to roll these sleeves up.
  • lengthened the back bodice piece but kept the front piece short. I added extensions to the bottom of each side seam so I could hem little slits in each side.


Here is the top photographed untucked and with the sleeves left long to help you get a better visual of the modifications I made and how these relate to the top’s actual shape. I won’t be wearing it this way in real life, but I needed the length in those arms to create the bulky, rolled up look you see in the earlier photos. I paired the top with my favourite leather skirt.

 




Simplicity 5047: Anna Sui herringbone chambray man-shirt

I’d originally intended to sew this shirt up as an Archer. I even purchased the pattern (the PDF version because that’s all there was TWO weeks ago). The problem is that we don’t have a printer at home. Like a land-line phone, it’s one of those things we haven’t really felt an urgency to purchase since setting up from scratch over here.

Hubby was going to get it printed for me, but then he balked at the 60 pages and promptly left for a week long business trip. Honestly, it wasn’t me! I had my gloriously soft Anna Sui chambray on standby and it was giving me the eye so I was forced to come up with some alternate arrangements.


Introducing Simplicity 5047, a vintage men’s shirt pattern that I picked up for a 25c steal at a recent garage sale. The pattern is for a 36″ chest. My bust measurement is 35″, but without much bust to speak of. I also have quite broad shoulders, so my logic told me that perhaps a small men’s shirt pattern would be more likely to fit, where other’s have failed before.

Anna Sui button up and my leather circle skirt

I was right! I am so happy with the fit. The shoulders are wide enough. No broad back adjustment was necessary. I wasn’t aiming for a slim fit, but I didn’t want it to be too boxy or roomy through the torso either. It feels just right. I didn’t have to add fish eye darts in the back like I thought I would. The arm length works, but next time I will lengthen them a smidgen. I figured the arms would be longer than usual to cater for long, man arms. As it turns out, my alien arms are a little longer than that of mankind. The only change I made to the pattern was to flick one side of the cuff placket around so that I could have French cuffs instead of regular.



 



 
I like the look of chambray paired with my leather circle skirt. But when I was looking at the photos, I realised for the first time that a little peep had been drawing on my leg. Leg is clearly a far more creative medium than paper. I like that she matched my skirt though.
 
  

The best thing about this pattern is the collar. In fact, if I’m perfectly honest, it was the collar that swayed me more towards getting started on the vintage pattern instead of waiting for my Archer. But unfortunately it is another one of those all in one collar band and collars. It works well enough, but I just feel that it isn’t the proper way of doing things.The neck width feels great though. I love it done up to the top button. But it also works well undone and paired with my favourite maxi skirt.

I love the fit of this shirt, but there are a few construction details that I will change next time I sew this pattern. There is no proper front button placket. It’s more of a self-facing that is folded inwards, but not stitched down. Next time I will add a proper front placket as well as a collar band for a more professional finish. I will also shave a bit off the sleeve cap. There was a ridiculous amount of unnecessary ease in those sleeve caps.

It’s so nice to sew a shirt that fits well right off the bat. I’ve always had trouble finding RTW shirts that fit, due to my long arms and broad shoulders (comparatively speaking to other females). Perhaps I should have been looking in the menswear section instead!