A floor length skirt in leopard print

This a wardrobe staple. Everybody needs a floor length, leopard print skirt, right?!

The fabric is a luxe, cotton jacquard from The Fabric Store. I say luxe, because the print is so beautiful. The fabric though, is actually perfect for daywear. It is a lovely, heavyweight cotton blend that is easy to wash and care for. It does fray a little though, so I’d recommend serging the edges before prewashing. Otherwise, it was a dream to work with.

I decided on a skirt, but I think this fabric would also be amazing made up into a blazer or jacket. And if you are looking for something similar but for a more formal occasion, you need to check out this animal print jacquard!

I didn’t use a pattern to make this skirt. It was freestyle sewing all the way. The design is pretty simple. The top edge is turned over in a very deep “hem” which rises above the natural waist to create that high-waisted, “paper-bag” waist look. There is only one seam at the back of the dress, an invisible zipper which extends all the way to the top. It is basically one big rectangle (aside from the slight hi-lo shape at the bottom hem, which I cut away at the end).

I finished the top of the skirt and sewed the zipper in first. Then I pinned it to my body to create the perfect sized pleats at the waist. There are two big pleats at the front and two at the back. It was a very back to front way of sewing a skirt but it worked out perfectly! It fits perfectly with, or without a belt. However, I prefer the look of the skirt with a little skinny belt worn at the waist.

Megan longline cardi in striped merino jersey

I’ve made the Megan longline cardigan before. It’s a super easy make that is also an extremely practical addition to a transeasonal wardrobe.

For this version, I used a beautiful, striped merino jersey from The Fabric Store. It looks like my stripes might be sold out but there are other options that are equally as beautiful. It’s a lovely weight fabric for layering, or for wearing alone in Fall. I love merino jersey because it is soft and comfy to wear. It’s warm! And very importantly, it launders well.

With a few exceptions (coating fabrics, dry clean only plans), I wash all my fabric hard (on hot) and put them in the dryer (on hot) before sewing with them. I do this to make sure there’s no chance of future shrinkage or change when my finished garments accidentally get thrown in the dryer in the future. I’ll usually still try to gently wash my “nice” finished garments, but I know at some point they’ll all end up in the dryer, accidentally or not. I’ve learnt from experience that life gets in the way of garment care in my house. I’ve also found that if I choose quality fabrics, they are usually tougher than you imagine. I sew day-to-day clothes using plenty of silk, linen, wool, and cotton. I haven’t (nor have my washing helpers) destroyed a single fabric yet!

But back to this great cardi. I made very few modifications. I lengthened it by a few inches (3-4 inches for the hem and 1-2 inches for the sleeves). I also cut the back piece as one, and widened the shoulder seams to accommodate my swimmer shoulders. My binding is a little wider than the pattern suggests. I just went with the width that I thought would look better for this striped pattern.

I know I will get a lot of wear out of this great cardi. Merino knit is probably one of my favourite fabrics to wear in Winter and Fall.

Vogue 9186 in linen stripes

My second Fall project for 2018 is this linen dress. I love the oversized style of it!

I used Vogue pattern 9186 and a beautiful medium weight linen (Hampton Stripe) from Pitt Trading Fabrics in Australia (obviously they ship internationally ;-)). The fabric is truly beautiful. I think they may have sold out of this now, but I imagine it would have made a great pair of trousers or a blazer too. No lining required.

I altered this pattern a little. I did my usual broad shoulder adjustment at the shoulder seams. I took a photo this time too!

I also lengthened the hem by about 14 inches. This turned out to be a little too much on one side because of the asymmetrical nature of the dress. I ended up chopping off a corner and piecing the hem a little to create a more even hem, whilst still maintaining a good length.

I really LOVE the sleeves and placket and the fit and shape of the dress. I’m not so sure about the elastic casing at the waist. I loved the dress without, but there is excess fabric on one side of the dress to allow for the ruching. I sewed the elastic casing in and then unpicked most of it because I didn’t like the look. I don’t mind keeping just a little section on one side. I will sew this pattern again, but I’ll probably cut the front and back on the fold and ditch the elastic casing and extra fabric on the other side.

 

Satin pants – Vogue 1347

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Some time ago, I was the recipient of several large remnants of lovely vintage fabric. Mostly, it was made up of silks, but there were a few synthetics in there too, including the pale green satin I used for these pants.

This satin (although very beautiful and silk-like) is a pretty tricky colour to pair with most of the skin types in my immediate family. Harper, Annecy and I have very fair skin and blue eyes. I have a very warm undertone to my skin which gives me the illusion of a looking tanned at times, but (for example) I use the palest shade of Lancome foundation available. This particular shade of green is probably one of the worst colours you could ever put on us. Miss Eight, with her coppery hair and green-tinted, blue eyes, could have pulled it off, but even so, I think there are more beautiful colours I could put her in when she gets old enough to wear a heavy satin like this.

It probably would have sat in my stash indefinitely had the thought of satin track pants not occured to me. And pants, being a considerable distance from my face, would not be as likely to drain me of all my human colour.

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I used a Chado Ralph Rucci pattern (Vogue 1347) that I’ve used a few times before. I like the fit of the elastic waist pants, and the legs are drafted long and wide (even for me!). I made a few small modifications to the pattern.

  • I changed the waistband construction, by stitching on a separate waistband casing, rather than simply folding down (albeit with some tidy bias facing). This *may* have dropped the waist height by about a half inch. I can’t quite remember. I also made my wasitband extra wide. I stitched a seam 1 cm from the folded edge of the waistband so it would “ruffle” slightly above the encased elastic.
  • I omitted the pockets because I though they might be too visible/bulky under the satin. I regret this decision a bit now! I do love pockets.
  • I added a black panel down the side of the leg. I seamed the back leg portion of the pants to include this panel.
  • I added 1 inch to the length of the legs.

I took a while to decide whether I wanted to line these pants or not. In the end I chose to fully line them in a beige-coloured, acetate lining fabric. The lining will increase their comfort against my skin since acetate is breathable and poly satin is not. It also adds warmth (Winter!), smooths and strengthens the outer fabric.

These are fun pants that I will enjoy wearing during Winter as a change from jeans. I’ve paired them with the satin cami I made recently, because it was still very hot when I was taking photos. I’ll probably be wearing them differently in a few months, perhaps with a button down shirt and blazer, or a sweater and coat. I’m sure I’ll have more photos to share on Instagram soon.

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A refashion fest

It is still quite warm here in Kansas City. In fact, today the heat was back in full force. But mostly, this time of year is gorgeous, with less humidity, cooler nights, and pleasant days. I’m still not inspired to get on with my coat-making, but I have been thinking about my Fall wardrobe plans.

I’ve been pulling out the sweaters and going through my wardrobe to look for gaps. One thing I also do between seasons is to assess the clothes I own and identify what I don’t like anymore (and what I can possibly refashion). It’s amazing how much you can do with existing clothes to update an entire wardrobe without purchasing/making a thing.

You’ve already seen the culottes that I narrowed to refresh into a boxier shape that is more current for this year. I also shortened this floor-length velvet dress. I LOVED the glamour of the maxi version and I wore it for the holidays last year, but my life doesn’t call for floor length gowns very often. I tried it as shorter dress but I still didn’t feel the love.

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A little more cutting (and hand-stitching that hem for the third time!) and now it’s become a top that I’m really in love with! I’ll get tons of wear out of it in this version and the portions I cut off the dress can be reworked as a garment for one of my girls.

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Slip dresses have had their moment this Summer, but they’ll also be great for going into Fall. Remember this dress? It was my go-to out-to-dinner dress over Summer, but I’m getting bored of the cold shoulder look (at every turn in my wardrobe anyway!). I cut off the sleeves and rebound the armscye, adding small spaghetti straps to drop the neckline a little. Now I have a slip dress that I can wear alone or layered with a turtleneck and boots.

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I’ve also been playing around with layering. I dug out this old playsuit that I made using a vintage pattern years ago. Layering it makes for such a comfy and seasonally appropriate combo.

Even though I already liked this thrifted vintage dress a lot, it was a tricky one to wear in real life. The weight of the fabric meant it was way too hot for Summer, and yet the style doesn’t really suit colder weather. Converting it to a top has made it much more wearable for me, and the fabric is the perfect weight for Fall.

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I’m also a little in love with dramatic sleeves right now (same as always, right!). But instead of sewing myself a brand new top, I cut the cuffs off an existing shirt and drafted my own big, fancy cuffs to re-attach. This totally elevates the basic white shirt and is going to make my Fall layering just a little bit more… me. There’s a post about this refashion¬†here.

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And while I was at it, I trimmed back and re-bound the armscye of this pretty little top. The fabric is divine but I found the original shape a bit boxy/masculine with the wider shoulder seams. I think it will now work better with more separates. I’ll try to get some photos posted soon.

And finally, I’m also a little tired of the torn denim, bare knee jean, so I took an old vintage skirt and used it to patch up my white denim.¬†These jeans are now so fun and I can’t wait to pair them with a snuggly sweater in the coming months. More photos coming soon on this one too.

It’s actually been a lot of fun finding and reviving hidden treasures in my wardrobe. Does anyone else attack their wardrobe with scissors between seasons?

Pleated silk skirt

So this was a bit of a random make and totally unplanned, but the fabric just grabbed me and demanded to be made into something wearable… and immediately. It arrived in the mail and bypassed my stash completely.

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I actually went shopping for wool coating, but as always, I ended up with fabric in my cart that I never set out to purchase, namely, this glorious silk CDC. The colours just scream Fall, even if the fabric isn’t really the most Fall-appropriate.

What I wanted to sew with it was a floor length, ruffly, slinky skirt. But we all know how much wear that would get in real life. I thought sensible thoughts and turned it into a  gently pleated midi instead. I can wear this skirt with sandals and tanks, or with long boots, tights, and sweaters. It will get heaps of wear.

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I didn’t use a pattern because I’m good with measuring my waist and a skirt like this is simply just two big rectangles. I winged the pleats, but made sure to match them up. When I had the volume I liked, I jiggled the side seams to match up with my waistband.

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The waistband is the only point of interest in this skirt. Because the design was pretty foolproof, I thought I’d try something a little new. I’d read somewhere (no idea where) that you could use elastic to face a pair of pants (for comfort). I didn’t have the right width elastic on hand, but I did have a yard of a performance ribbing fabric, which feels and stretches like woven elastic. The only thing I had to do was measure the length and overlock the edges. Normal elastic used as facing would look a lot neater than my version (as would matching thread!), but as this was an experiment (and on the inside of my skirt), I wasn’t too worried about appearance.

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Contstruction of the waistband with elastic is almost identical to if you were using facing. I still interfaced the waistband fabric. I just avoided creating seams with the elastic. To do this, I overlapped the waistband fabric with the elastic so only the waistband fabric was folded back against itself.

Using elastic as a facing just creates a bit more comfort with the waistband. It stays tight, but has more give when sitting and breathing. I’m definitely going to use this method in future waistbands, and refine it so it looks pretty too.

 

 

Black overalls for Fall

I may have jumped the gun a little with this make, but I know I will get a LOT of wear out of these overalls in a few months time when the weather eventually cools. My plan is to wear them with crisp, collared shirts, and my plethora of off-the-shoulder tops. But in the meantime, there might be the odd occasion that I could wear them sans layers.

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I didn’t follow a complete pattern for this make. I slightly narrowed the pants from this playsuit, and then just modified this fitted bodice to a new shape. Having already sewn a few playsuits, I had a good idea of the bodice length I needed (which is one of the most important aspects of a playsuit in my opinion. Nobody wants a saggy butt, or to be cut in half!).

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The fabric I used is a very thick, crisp, cotton twill by Theory. It has a little bit of stretch like a cotton sateen and the good side has a soft, washed silk appearance and feel to it which makes the black appear more charcoal in colour. It’s a wonderful fabric that will be lovely and warm for Winter, but way too heavy for any other time of the year. I’ve purchased Theory branded fabric from Mood on several occasions now and the quality of this particular brand has always been exceptional.

Part of the reason why I got started on these overalls was because I stumbled across a buckle kit for sale at Hancocks before they closed down. I didn’t use the no-sew buttons though. I had a couple of deep shank metal buttons in my stash that I liked so much better.

At this point, I’ve only basted the hem in place. I just can’t decide how long or short I want the pants! I’m very tempted to crop them a little bit more for Fall, but with a deep hem that I can lengthen again in the future.

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