Coco Racer #11001

There’ll be no prizes for guessing who this swimsuit pattern is named after. She was instrumental in testing the first samples for me…over…and…over…again, during the past 18 months. This design has taken time, but in the end we nailed it. No underarm or neck chaffe, no pulling on the shoulders, no constricting the shoulder blades, no wedgies, no catching water in the bottom or through the neck.

We like it best made fully lined, as the design instructs. However, I have made a “racing” version of the suit by just lining the crotch and omitting the front and back lining. It’s a nice suit that looks good and performs well.

I have several more swimsuit designs in the pipeline, both for kids and adults. I’m also considering putting together some kits since I have a stash of the most beautiful Italian swimsuit fabric on hand (chlorine resist, UP50, recycled). As soon as I finish juggling some of life’s curveballs, I might get on with it! ūüėČ

My Image and B-Trendy sewing pattern books

A few weeks ago I was contacted by a small independant pattern group in the Netherlands, Made by Oranges. They asked if they could send me (for free) a few of their magazines in the hope that I might like to share what they’re doing. Well, I’m always keen to find out about new things in the sewing world and I like to support small businesses so I thought it would be a good idea to share!

img_1707

Made by Oranges consists of Jet (patternmaker) and Martin (graphics designer). They used to work for a Dutch sewing magazine, but when it ceased production, they decided to set up on their own. They currently produce two magazines. My Image contains 16 sewing patterns for women in sizes 34-52 (XS-3XL) and B-Trendy comes with 20 sewing patterns for girls and boys from 1 to 14 years old. All patterns contain instructions in 5 languages, including English.

img_1711

img_1710

img_1709

I’ll confess that I was most interested in trying out some of the kid’s patterns. There are some really cute and practical staples in the edition I have. I’m not that familiar with other sewing magazines out there, but I am a sucker for Japanese pattern books.¬†I’m definitely inspired to have a go at a few casual coats and Winter dresses for my big girls.

The pattern pieces are overlapped just as you’d find in a Japanese pattern book. There are instructions for each of the patterns in several languages. The instructions are brief, but the patterns look pretty straight forward and easy to follow. I’d suggest that an advanced beginner would have no problem at all.

img_1715

Some of the women’s patterns look great too. There is an interesting collection of practical wardrobe builders, with plenty of photographs to inspire you. If you like trying new designs each season, and don’t mind a bit of tracing, then this would be a fun magazine to check out. Here are a few more photos to get an idea of what’s inside.

img_1714

img_1713

img_1712

Apart from sewing magazines, Made by Oranges also make PDF sewing patterns, and they can even customize a size for you if your size is not available. There are also a few free patterns to try on their site. Until November 1st, you can use the discount code: LILYSAGE  for a 25% discount on all their products.

 

 

A little Target knock-off for Miss Eight

Even though I sew a lot of clothes for my daughters, I’m not averse to shopping the Target clearance racks. I often find little gems there that I generally couldn’t make for the price on the tag (and this always takes a bit of pressure off my sewing to-do list).

The other day, I picked up a very simple, loose fitting top for Miss Six that Miss Eight immediately fell in love with also. My eight year old and six year old are very similar in size now and the top easily fit them both. All I had to do was rub off an exact copy for the older child.

coco1

coco6

The top is kind of a peasant style, but with little flutter sleeves and a front bodice with shoulder seams that swing around towards the back. The trickiest bit was navigating the angle of the shoulder seam and trying to determine the shape and depth of the armscye because in stretching out the elastic neckline to do so, I was also pulling the top out of shape. I came close to getting it right but I will have to angle the shoulder seam down more next time and raise the armscye. Otherwise, we’re all delighted with how the little top turned out.

coco5

I used my leftover vintage voile (from this dress). It’s very sheer, so she’ll wear a nude cami under the top. On the topic of kid undergarments, I bought her a few of these camisoles the other day (no affiliate link, I just think they are a great product). They are beautifully smooth and fitted, with little adjustable spaghetti straps; an exact, mini version of something I would wear. They are a more elegant option than the traditional singlet for an eight year old and I think this “grown up” appeal is why they may actually get worn. I bought them mainly to be worn as an extra layer during Winter. They’d be easy to sew, but y’all know how much I love sewing staples…

coco2

The shorts are a little version of my Cartwheel Shorts pattern that I made without the front pleats for a little less volume. I used my leftover vintage linen/lace tablecloth (seen also here). I think these shorts look adorable on her. If you follow me on IG, you may have seen the matching pair that I made for Miss Six too. She’s very proud of her artwork!

 

A Twirl to Me dress for Miss Eight

I made this little dress way back in April for my daughter’s birthday. She specifically requested it. We’d just been through the seasonal wardrobe shuffle which meant that a lot of her dresses were passed onto her younger sister, including this favourite¬†that I made for her last year.

ttm4

The pattern is the Twirl to Me dress, in the maxi length. The fabric is vintage, found at an estate sale for less than a few dollars. It is a beautiful cotton sateen, but quite an old fashioned print. I was surprised that Coco picked this from my stash, but it ended up suiting the dress very nicely.

ttm1

I know she’ll get a lot of twirls out of this little party dress. It’s obviously not quite as practical as a simple T and shorts, or the tunic dresses I make for her day to day wear, but it is a dress that makes her feel special when she wears it. And everybody needs something like that in their closet.