Spring stripes

When I purchase fabric, I usually have a project in mind, but I rarely follow sewing patterns without some sort of modification. This means that I’ve had to get pretty good at estimating fabric requirements on my own. I usually come pretty close these days, but sometimes I end up erring on the more generous side (because it gives me a little leeway to change my mind on the design, and because I know that I’ll always find a good use for the scraps if any remain).

This was the case with some lovely hand-dyed velvet, wool crepe, and ponte that I found in my stash. I loved the way the contrasting colours looked together. They all have some stretch, but not enough to do away with darts. The velvet and wool are woven, but the ponte was a knit.

I started by cutting the fabrics into wide strips (seaming some of the velvet strips for extra length where needed). Then I stitched them together to create a striped fabric. I had just enough fabric to make a midi skirt in a slim-fitting style. I designed it by draping (on myself!) and re-stitching those stripe seams around the hips and bottom until they absorbed the darts needed to create the fitted shape.

In retrospect, I should have left the initial (striped fabric) seams unfinished (no overlocking!) until I’d sewn the final garment. I ended up doing a lot of unpicking of those overlocked seams to shape the top of the skirt. I also added gores (of orange wool crepe) to the bottom of the skirt for a bit of extra flare.

There’s a bit of a difference in the amount of stretch in each fabric. So, even though the stripes are the same width, the white ponte stretches more than the velvet, and this is most apparent at the waist. I probably should have made the ponte a little narrower, or the velvet a little wider to adjust for this.

I’m still pretty happy with how it turned out though. It’s a warm and comfortable skirt for Spring. And it just so happens to match perfectly with my refashioned velvet top.

 

18″ dolls clothes (AKA American Girl doll sewing)

It only occurred to me the other day, that I should think about putting all this into a blog post. I don’t normally sew doll’s clothes and I probably won’t be doing it again anytime soon, but I’ve recently sewn a big pile of them.

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American Girl dolls are all the rage in our house right now. We currently have two (Target versions), and a third is on it’s way for a Miss nearly-Five’s birthday next month. However, they’re all a bit lacking in the wardrobe department. At the moment, my fabric scraps are being twisted and tied around the poor dolls in a type of rustic fashion design. So it occurred to me that Santa would be on a winning wicket if he delivered a big supply of 18″doll’s clothes at Christmas.

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All these clothes were made using my itty bitty fabric scraps. The scrapbusting was very satisfying, but I had to overcome a very obvious problem with my plan. My girls would very easily recognise the scraps and think that I had made them instead of Santa. I came up with a strategy. A few weeks ago, I received a call from one of Santa’s assistants, asking me to donate some of my fabric scraps. Of course, I didn’t know why. It was a very exciting mystery. My girls took an enormous amount of pleasure in going through my scrap basket and hand-picking scraps to send to Santa, speculating the whole time what he was planning to do with them. We then wrapped up the parcel together, addressed it to Santa, and I ‘posted’ it the next day.

Dolls clothes are very quick and easy to make, but I did have to get over my need to ‘finish’ the seams and raw edges appropriately. That was the toughest bit. The first few outfits I made had all serged seams, and all raw edges were finished and turned under. However, a quick peek at some shop-bought dolls clothes told me that I was being ridiculous. I was spending way to much time on them.

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The patterns I used worked really well and fit the dolls perfectly. I still have more to make yet, including some swimsuits. I plan to sew a couple of items between each of the bigger projects I finish over the next few months. I’ll continue to work through the sewing patterns pictured below.

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A mini Chloe dress for Miss Eight

My girls have been watching my production of cold-shoulder dresses and tops and begging me to make them the same. This make is literally all scraps, right down to the miscellaneous, handmade, but unmatched silk and rayon bias bindings.

It’s almost an exact replica of my Chloe dress pattern, but in a mini size.

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The fabric is an old poly from Spotlight. It fades a little, and catches occasionally, but it’s lightweight, and otherwise wears pretty well. In fact, it wears incredibly well, because I’m pretty sure I’ve seen Miss Eight wearing her other dress in this fabric at least twice a week since I made it.

This dress was always intended as a wearable muslin, but it has turned into one of those rare occasions where I don’t want to change a single thing about it. And I’m pretty sure Miss Eight feels the same. I’ve been watching her wear it. It looks comfortable and non-restrictive for play. It’s nearly too short for her, but she likes to wear bike pants under dresses anyway, so it still works. On an average height girl, the dress would be more modest.

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Miss Six and Miss Four have put in their orders so I better get to work grading this pattern down for them. It looks like we might all be twinning in a few weeks.

Linen romper

So this wasn’t a complete fail, but I really don’t love it. I tried so hard to make it work, but still, all I’m feeling is meh…

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It’s not a complete loss though. The linen was salvaged from old makes and small remnants that I had lying around. It was incredibly satisfying to clear my scrap pile of all the lovely linens (which are too beautiful to throw away, but too small to make anything worthwhile with). If you look closely, the front and back of the shorts are actually two different blues… this make was scrapbusting at it’s finest!

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The colour-blocking was determined by the scraps I had on hand. The shorts are based on the Carolyn Pyjama pattern. I lengthened the crotch rise (front and back) by 1.5 inches in order to raise the waistline and make them suitable for a romper design.

The top half was designed by me. It’s very basic. I chickened out of the front-tie design I originally had planned. I liked the look better but the deep, deep neckline would have rendered it for beach-wear only. As it is, I may not love this make, but it will still be a practical wardrobe addition for Summer.

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Tie back boots by Big Little // pattern tested

I pattern tested for Lisa Spearman of Big Little recently. You might have already seen the first sneaky peek of my test version on Instagram. It’s exciting to report that the pattern is now ready to go and it’s available in the Big Little Etsy shop until Sunday with a discount if you use the code: BOOTS.

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It was an utterly out of season make for me (38 degrees Celcius days are the norm for us right now) but I still jumped at the chance to be a tester for these. All I could think of was my stash of glorious little wool and cashmere scraps that are too small to do anything useful with, but far too good to throw away. These little slippers make the perfect scrapbust for those particular fabrics.

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My test version was made using Italian wool coating (used here) and pink wool double crepe (seen here, and here, and here). I used denim for the soles and lined them with cashmere (remnants from my Dior coat) for the inner sole and beautiful Italian brushed cotton shirting (leftover from here). I felted all my wool and cashmere in the washing machine and dryer first. Lisa advises on how to do this but it is pretty common sense. Just think hot, hot, hot, until the fabric fibres are so tight and thick that the fabric won’t stretch anymore.

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I had to hide these boots from Miss Three. She was trying to wear them everywhere and I was feeling hot just looking at her. I’ll definitely be making these boots for Miss Five and Miss Seven next. In fact, I think they would make the perfect (and seasonally appropriate) Christmas stocking fillers for those of us in the Northern hemisphere.

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