Category Archives: drape

Oliver + S Apple Picking Dress in bird fabric

When I went fabric shopping for my bias dress muslin, I may have purchased a little too much of this particular bird fabric. It has a lovely, light-weight feel and drape, but it is still 100% polyester. I find it easier to overlook the poly-factor when filling my childrens’ wardrobes.

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Miss Seven was the recipient of this Apple Picking Dress by Oliver + S. There are quite a few details in this pattern that require a little extra care, but nothing is particularly complicated. In fact, the only thing that made this dress difficult was my choice of slippery, press-resistant polyester. Pure cotton or silk would sew up like a dream.

I really like the double, front button placket and collar/tie. I also love the loose bodice and drop waist shape. My front placket is far from perfect. I didn’t match my interfacing well enough to the fabric and buttonholes. There’s some puckering on the buttonholes which I find very annoying. I should have gone a little sturdier on the stabilising. Maybe it also would have helped if I’d lowered the stitch tension.

A size 7 in this pattern fits Miss Seven very well. The shoulder width and arm length looks good to me. I sewed the full length arms and they are probably designed to sit a little longer, but this length is very practical for a child. I’m not sure why the front placket is pulling up when the dress is worn. It could be that I tied the collar a little too tight. It could also be due to the way she is standing (with her shoulders back and arched slightly).

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I’ll definitely sew this pattern again. My choice of fabric works beautifully with this style of dress. It’s a design that would also sew up exceptionally well in silk for a special occasion.

 

The bias cut dress // RTW copy

About ten years ago, I purchased a dress on whim from a little boutique in Wells, Somerset (England). I was in my twenties. I didn’t sew. I was fickle with fashion (I still am). I had no idea about fabric back then, apart from the vague understanding that silk was special.

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This is the dress that caught my eye. It wasn’t the type of dress I’d normally wear. It was silk satin (oh the splendour!) and about three times what I’d normally pay for a garment. I remember loitering in that boutique for what seemed like hours, but I eventually walked out the door with it and I’m so glad that I did. As far as semi-formal dresses go (aka wedding guest/corporate dinner attire), this one has had the most wear of anything I’ve ever bought.

I’d been meaning to copy it for a long time now, but I’ve been hesitant because it is bias cut silk. And not recently bias cut either, so whilst it still fits beautifully, it has visibly grown in different places from years spent on the hanger. I wasn’t confident that I would be able to identify the correct shapes of the different pattern pieces.

I also don’t sew a lot of bias cut garments. I adore bias cuts but I still find them a little magical. The pattern shapes are different to regular patterns because the bias stretch needs to be taken into account when drafting. I’m sure there is a formula for this but I’m not experienced with it. There are also different techniques for sewing fabrics on the bias. The unknown is further amplified by the fact that slippery, difficult to manage fabrics are the ones that often make the most beautiful bias cut garments.

My first plan was to look for a bias cut dress pattern that I could use and adapt. I found two wonderful patterns that I may still sew one day. However, because I had quite specific style lines in mind and was wary about sizing and fit, I chose to drape the pattern on my dress mannequin instead. It took me two calico muslins to achieve a fit that I was happy with. This dress is my wearable muslin.

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The fabric is inexpensive polyester with a reasonably close hand to silk. However, the drape and bias stretch in this is still less than what you’d get with a beautiful silk satin. The hem of my muslin didn’t grow by anything discernible (by my eye) in a whole week. Because the polyester is a little more stable, there’s less “cling” in my muslin than the original. You want cling with a bias cut dress. But, apart from pressing, it was also easier to sew.

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I’m very happy with the fit of my version of this dress. Seeing it side by side with it’s RTW inspiration is a great help in seeing what needs to be changed. The skirt needs to be pegged in at the bottom more. Perhaps the edge of the armscye could be moved medially a smidgen in the front. The back is a bit roomier in my version, but this is a good thing. You can’t see it in the photos, but the back darts on my RTW dress are straining and the stitches have been stretched permanently to twice their size. Otherwise, it’s pretty close. Correcting the skirt will hopefully move it from secretary to screen goddess. I might also try some little sleeves in the future.

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Daisy Chain Top for Miss Three

I made this  Daisy Chain top specifically to go with Miss Three’s fairy shorts. I salvaged my last little bits of fairy fabric and paired it with a little bit of white linen.

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I bound the hem with self made binding in a floral that co-ordinates with the fairy fabric. Unfortunately, it doesn’t match perfectly. I didn’t have any suitable white binding on hand or enough fairy fabric, or any confidence that I would like the look of a top with fairies on it anyway. For the back placket, I made use of what buttons I already had on hand (quite boring but in the perfect subtle shade of pearl blush).

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I’m not usually a fan of novelty fabric (heaven knows why I purchased the fairy cotton in the first place). My plan was to simply get those fairy faces out of my stash. It has, however, turned out to be one of the sweetest things that I’ve made for this child. I catch myself admiring her each and every time she twirls by.

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A blue cotton top

I’m putting this top to bed. I like it from some angles and not from others. I might still wear it, or I might cut it up and modify it, but I don’t think I want to make another.

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The fabric that I’ve used does it no favours. It’s a denim-look cotton shirting with just enough stretch to keep the bound armscye and neckline permanently wrinkled, despite a good pressing.

Perhaps I could lower the neckline and change the shape of the front armscye, or add darts, but I’m just not loving it either way. And I need to love it if I’m going to spend any more time on it. Sometimes you just have to let things go.

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Vogue 8975…comfort over style

Last summer when I was in the middle of my summer drop-waist frenzy, I made a particular favourite using a stunning printed cotton from Tessuti. It was one of those rare occasions when I had a dress in mind and then went shopping specifically to find a fabric to match that vision. Usually, I fall in love with fabrics first and then draw inspiration from them.

Now this particular fabric suited my purpose well and I liked it well enough, but I probably wouldn’t have chosen it without a specific project in mind. However, it ended up being one of those prints that I fell madly in love with more each time I saw it, which was very often, believe me. So when I happened across a lovely jersey version of the exact same print (on my farewell trip to Tessuti), I snapped it up.

I’ve been desperate to use it ever since but have been struggling with ideas. I spent a bit of time looking for a suitable pattern and eventually found one I quite liked, Vogue 8975.

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I just love big, draped pockets right now and I think that was the thing that drew me to this pattern. In hindsight, none of the dresses on the cover are really my style, but I was on a mission to sew up that fabric! Can anyone else relate?

 

The experience of sewing this dress was fantastic. The drapey knit was a little fiddly to work with, but not impossible. I still don’t have my overlocker, so I used the opportunity to experiment with the stitches on my Pfaff. I have a stitch and overlock stitch-in-one feature on my sewing machine. It works well but is very slow going compared to using an overlocker. You also have to go back and trim every seam after you sew them. But the end result is good (as long as you are VERY careful not to stretch the fabric as you sew).

The drapes on this dress are just lovely and the pocket construction was ingenious. I loved making this dress and watching the puzzle pieces come together. I would have loved to place the floral pattern a bit better on the dress, but I barely had enough fabric as it was. I wasn’t planning to use any contrast fabric in my version of this dress but unfortunately necessity demanded it. I found the contrast jersey knit at Jo-Ann. It was my first fabric purchase in the US, having been somewhat underwhelmed by the fabric shopping in Kansas. I was totally spoilt in Australia, living so close in proximity to the amazing fabric shops of Surry Hills. I now realise that I am just going to have to do my shopping online, but I have prepared for this with a nice 30″ screen to view my fabric on!

But back to this dress. I think it is a fraction too roomy in the upper chest and arms for me. It may be that the size is a little large, combined with the fact that my fabric is a little lighter and a bit more drapey than that on the cover photo. You can see the sizing problem best when my hands are on my hips. A closer fit would make for a nicer silhouette.  But I have to admit that it is still quite a lovely dress. I’ve since seen some other great versions of this dress in the blogosphere, here and here, and here which you might also like to check out. Call me boring, but I think I like the monochrome versions best.

At the moment, I’m a little undecided about the hems at the sleeves and bottom of the dress. At the moment I have left them raw (they roll nicely in this particular fabric). I just felt that hemming them with a twin needle would add bulk and affect the clean drape of this particular fabric. I’d prefer to do a narrow hem on the bottom of the dress using an overlocker (when I eventually get one). I could probably do this on my Pfaff using some stabilizer but I don’t want to lose any length on the dress. I’m also thinking of adding contrast cuffs to the sleeves, or simply removing the sleeves altogether.

End note: So when I had the photos taken and first started writing this post, I was pretty sure that I wouldn’t wear this dress again. But the fabric is just so deliciously soft and the style so comfortable and perfect for Spring, that despite my misgivings, I have found myself slipping it on at the end of most days. It is a shame that this beautiful fabric doesn’t get the proper show-time of a regular day out and about on the town, but at least my neighbours get to admire it (styled with the regulatory in-house Ugg boots of course). It really has become the perfect little French house dress for me!