Category Archives: fabric

Vogue 9186 in a Mini Big Cat print

A short while ago, I made a long, linen dress using V9186. I love it a lot. I especially like the shape of the sleeves and collar. I like it so much that I decided to have a go turning it into a little top.

I had to modify the pattern a bit. The original pattern is asymmetrical in design so the pattern pieces are all cut flat. I simply traced one side of the pattern front and back and used those pieces to cut on the fold. I cut it to a top length and left everything else pretty much the same. The top is slightly flared and there’s plenty of ease so no bust darts were required.

It’s a very simple, cotton top. The fabric is a Mini Big Cat printed cotton from The Fabric Store. It’s a lovely lightweight cotton and easy to work with. I’ve got a little extra left over which I hope to make into a Summer frock for Miss Eight. I’m just hesitant to cut into it quite yet, given Miss Eight’s tendency to grow like a weed. I can’t find my particular print on their site anymore, but I think this option would also make a super cute top.

I like this top with jeans. It’s a simple, fresh look that I love. However, I have bigger plans for the top and you will be updated soon (unless you follow me on IG of course!).

A silver dress for Fall

Everybody needs a silver dress, right? I’m not actually sure what inspired me to sew this dress. It all started with an amazing silver “Tiara” knit that I found online at Pitt Trading. The fabric is so fabulous that the dress design only needed to be simple.

I used the Poppy Dress pattern by By Hand London as a base for this dress design. I widened the neck and lowered it a bit at the back. I know the pattern has long sleeves but I didn’t have those pieces printed out. So I extended the short version myself, to create a nice, long, slim-fitting sleeve. I also increased the back darts to shape the dress more closely to my measurements.

The fabric has a great stripe on the underside of the silver right side. I utilized this stripe by folding up the hem on the bottom and sleeve edge. I hate wasting a good double-sided fabric.

This is such a fun dress. It will be the perfect holiday dress in a couple of months.

V9313 wrap dress in linen

This dress is already one of the favourite things I’ve ever made. I used a Vogue custom fit pattern, which has separate bodice pieces for different cup sizes. I used the A cup version. I cut a size 14 pattern as this corresponded most closely with my chest and waist measurements. Even so, I still made a few adjustments for cutting the fabric.

I added 5/8 inch to the shoulder seams on each side (as a wedge, as per my usual broad shoulders adjustment). I also added an extra half inch to the bodice length. I think I lengthened the sleeves too, but I can’t remember by how much. I also slashed and spread the sleeves by about an inch to widen them, and I cut them on the bias. Finally, I flattened the sleeve cap a little to reduce the ease. I wanted a very smooth armscye fit without much shape since I fit the bodice to sit the armscye right on the edge of my shoulders.

The pattern has great skirt options for this dress. However, I had my heart set on a gathered, midi length skirt. It’s basically just a big rectangle. As I often do, I start out by following the instructions and then get a little side-tracked with doing what I want to do. I began sewing this pattern in the same manner. The bodice is made up as per the instructons, with a fair bit of slip stitching! I lost interest in following the instructions after that so I really can’t comment on them anymore. I added a little hole in my waistband and lengthened the waistband straps so that I could wear the dress like a true wrap dress, with a tie at the back. I think the actual pattern calls for a button to secure the skirt at the front though.

The fabric is linen from The Fabric Store. I love it so much! The main stripes are a beautiful weight that really doesn’t need to be lined. The green micro striped linen is so soft and delicious that I want to make a hundred t-shirts out of it.

 

 

A Kobe Dress in Colette Dinnigan lace

My basement is currently in a bit of disarray. Unfortunately, that is where I usually sew… We’ve just had the concrete floor cut and pulled up to replace the old metal sewer pipes with brand, spanking new plastic ones. Yesterday, the concrete was poured. Today, we have a proper floor, but oh my, the dust!!! Soon, I’ll have to move everything so carpet can be put down. When the carpet is FINALLY down, I suspect I’ll take a bottle of champers to the basement to quietly celebrate in peace with my sewing equipment… for a whole weekend.

I’m currently waging a seemingly endless war against dust. But in the midst of my battles, I try to squeeze in a little sewing, even if it is only on Sundays right now. Summer break with the kiddos doesn’t help much. I don’t know why I always think I’ll find more time to sew over Summer. It never really happens.

In any case, last Sunday, I sloped off to our dusty basement (avoiding the big centre line ditch that still hadn’t been filled with concrete at that point. I slipped the drop sheets off my sewing tables and snuck in a little sewing. The outcome was a lovely lace, Kobe Dress. The pattern is one I’ve used before, by Papercut Patterns. The lace is Colette Dinnigan from Pitt Trading. The lace I used is sadly now sold out, but Pitt Trading has loads of other gorgeous laces that would do the job. My Colette lace came in panels. I used three for my version of this dress pattern, but I’m tall and I also lengthened the hem and sleeves quite a lot. I think most people could get away with using two panels to make the dress right out of the packet.

Sewing with lace isn’t that difficult. You just have to take your time. I’m by no means an expert, however, I am super happy with how this dress turned out.

To cut this lace, I knew I wanted to use the lace edge as a hem so I lined that up for the front and back. I used the entire panel length for the dress back pattern piece, and pretty much an entire panel for the front. But remember, I lengthened my dress (not sure how much by as I was most focussed on using the entire panel and lining up the hems). I’m also 5″10.  I used my third panel for the sleeves. Again, I wanted to use the lace edge to avoid hemming, so this used up most of one side of the panel. I have a little leftover lace, but no more useful lace edge left.

I finished the neckline with a narrow hem. I just took my time, basting down one fold, and then stitching slowly over the next fold. Using a walking foot helps with tension. It’s very important not to stretch the neck out as you sew, OR sew with the tension too tight. The rest of the seams in this dress are French seams. I think the fabric deserved that.

I’m wearing my Kobe dress over a black slip that is partly store-bought, and partly modified by me. It’s become one of my most important wardrobe accessories because I’m loving sheer dresses at the moment. I love this dress on it’s own, but the style also works well with a narrow belt. I’m also pleased that I spent the time on finishing it nicely with French seams. It’s a dress that I’ll probably hold on to forever.

Kobe top in sheer silk

I’m a little obsessed with floaty, sheer fabrics right now. And in my world, that literally means all the silks. Liberty of London do an amazing crinkle silk which I’ve used before. I’m thinking about using it next time if I sew this pattern up as a dress. For this version, I used a divine silk georgette from The Fabric Store.

I only made a few small modifications to the pattern. I sewed up a size small which is quite close to my measurements. However, I know I have to adjust for my shoulders these days, even when the bust measurement matches perfectly.

The adjustment that works well for me is this. I draw a diagonal line from the middle of the shoulder seam to the CB of the bottom of the top (or very close to it). I slice along this line and spread the shoulder seam by about 5/8″. It generally keeps the waist the same size but adds width to top most shoulder area, which fits well with the triangular body shape that those of us with strong shoulders and lats have. I repeat with both sides, and the front and back of the top. If the top hangs well below waist level, or I am dealing with a dress, I cut the pattern off at the waist so as not to widen the waist or hip area.

My first attempt at the Kobe top turned out a little shorter in the front than I expected, even with just a narrow hem. I usually lengthen patterns in the bodice by 1/2 inch to account for my 5″10 frame. I didn’t in this case and I’m pleasantly surprised. It’s a little outside my comfort zone, but still like this top a LOT. I don’t mind the sliver of tummy. But I know this top would also pair perfectly with my high waisted jeans.

The back is sitting a little lower in the photos than I expected. I think I wear this top pushed back a little to raise the neckline. I’ve been wearing the top with a little cropped top/soft bra underneath in a complementary shade of apricot in real life to avoid the peek of bra underneath. I think it works.

 

 

I whipped up a matching top

The thing I love about sewing is that I really can just whip up anything at a moment’s notice. This top took all of ten minutes to make. It’s not perfect. The construction is basic. But I only had a few spare minutes and I desperately wanted to finish this up before I had to pack away my machine.

In hindsight, I really should have spent more time on it. I didn’t expect it to turn out quite so well though!

The striped fabric skirt is something you’ve seen before. I created it by sewing together strips of scrap fabric (in velvet, wool, and ponte). I ended up with a tiny bit spare that I used up in this top. There was not an ounce of wastage.

This is very fun outfit. I love the idea of perfectly matching separates as I think they produce an overall dressier look. However, when mixed and matched with jeans and other tops, these separates also dress down for a great casual feel.

Spring stripes

When I purchase fabric, I usually have a project in mind, but I rarely follow sewing patterns without some sort of modification. This means that I’ve had to get pretty good at estimating fabric requirements on my own. I usually come pretty close these days, but sometimes I end up erring on the more generous side (because it gives me a little leeway to change my mind on the design, and because I know that I’ll always find a good use for the scraps if any remain).

This was the case with some lovely hand-dyed velvet, wool crepe, and ponte that I found in my stash. I loved the way the contrasting colours looked together. They all have some stretch, but not enough to do away with darts. The velvet and wool are woven, but the ponte was a knit.

I started by cutting the fabrics into wide strips (seaming some of the velvet strips for extra length where needed). Then I stitched them together to create a striped fabric. I had just enough fabric to make a midi skirt in a slim-fitting style. I designed it by draping (on myself!) and re-stitching those stripe seams around the hips and bottom until they absorbed the darts needed to create the fitted shape.

In retrospect, I should have left the initial (striped fabric) seams unfinished (no overlocking!) until I’d sewn the final garment. I ended up doing a lot of unpicking of those overlocked seams to shape the top of the skirt. I also added gores (of orange wool crepe) to the bottom of the skirt for a bit of extra flare.

There’s a bit of a difference in the amount of stretch in each fabric. So, even though the stripes are the same width, the white ponte stretches more than the velvet, and this is most apparent at the waist. I probably should have made the ponte a little narrower, or the velvet a little wider to adjust for this.

I’m still pretty happy with how it turned out though. It’s a warm and comfortable skirt for Spring. And it just so happens to match perfectly with my refashioned velvet top.