Category Archives: shirt

All the pretty linen scraps

Here is another little scrapbust that I finished up the other day. It’s so very satisfying to use up the pretty little pieces leftover from past projects. It seems that I like blue a lot.

jpbtie11

You’ve seen the striped linen before here. The gingham here. And I made the plaid up as a short sleeve button up for my husband years ago!

jpbtie8jpbtie6jpbtie10jpbtie3

The pattern I used is from a Japanese Pattern Book. The ISBN is 978-4-579-11300-2. I sewed up style L in size 13. I found the sizing to be a little larger in this style than I expected. The neckline is especially wide. I can make a style like this work in linen though.

jpbtie4

 

Japanese Pattern Book makes and a bit of scrapbusting

I’m on a bit of a scrapbusting mission right now. My fabric stash only consists of two storage containers, but I’d really love to get it down to one. I don’t hoard many fabrics. I generally only purchase fabrics with a project in mind. However, my fabric purchasing discipline is very possibly skewed by the fact that I don’t live near a bricks and mortar fabric store. I probably shouldn’t be too smug…

I have a few precious fabrics that I’m happy to save. I also have a bunch of remnants that I’ve carted across the globe with me. I recently pulled out all those small lengths and made little piles around my cutting table, hopefully to inspire me to use them up! Five years in stash is way too long. I’m hoping that if I keep them in sight, I’ll find projects for them over the next five months.

My first project was a quick, little jersey top for Miss Ten. I used a little leftover organic, cotton jersey from The Fabric Store and combined it with a little silver knit from Pitt Trading. I used a vintage pattern but had to modify it a bit.

Miss Nine had her eye on a few fabrics I’d sewn up for myself recently. She desperately wanted me to use some of my leftover leopard print jaquard to make something for her.

I didn’t have enough left for the entire pinafore, but I was able to mix and match with a bit of cotton sateen. The Mini Big Cat cotton and leopard print jacquard is from The Fabric Store. This is something similar to the jacquard. The green, cotton sateen is a very old remnant from my stash.

I used the same Japanese Pattern Book for her pinafore as I did for her Mini Big Cat top. The book is called A Sunny Spot from the Heart Warming Life Series. I sewed the pinafore one size smaller than the top. I made the top first so I had a better idea on fit for the pinafore. The fit of the top is acceptable. The pinafore fits her perfectly. She’s chuffed with the whole look. Now we just need these snow days to end so the kiddos can go back to school and I can get some more work done!

Fall and Rise Turtleneck for Fall

Sometimes I get my hands on a fabric that is just so gorgeous that I want to make a dozen things from it. Sometimes (but not very often at all) I’ll go back for seconds, and I’ll add that exact same fabric to my cart more than once. Let me introduce this organic cotton knit to you. It’s from The Fabric Store. It comes in two colourways. Sadly, the navy option is sold out, but I can tell you from experience, that the white option is just as beautiful. I love it because it is quite thick, stable, and ever so snuggly to wear.

I have the white colourway on my sewing table as we speak. Yes, I went back for seconds but I wasn’t quick enough to get more of the navy. I desperately want some to make myself some pyjamas with it. However, I can’t stop second guessing myself, that perhaps I should make something to wear out of the house instead… Stay tuned.

The pattern I used is the Rise and Fall Turtleneck by Papercut Patterns. I made the Fall version of this pattern, for Fall of course. Well, I was actually lured in by the nice dropped shoulder shape of the top. I shortened the turtleneck a bit and I wear it folded down. I also added a bit of length to the shoulder seams (broad shoulder adjustment). I think I may have lengthened the top a smidgen too.

Obviously, the biggest change I made is to the sleeves. I very nearly sewed the top exactly as per the pattern, but I chickened out at the last minute and added myself some big old flounces. It’s not a difficult modification. I basically just measured the armscye, copied that measurement to some pattern paper and drew a big circle flounce around it (think circle skirt shape). I graduated the length of the sleeve to be a little longer in the back. So I look like I have wings…

I’ve already worn this top quite a bit. It’s warm and cozy. It’s fun to wear with jeans. It’s also easy to layer when the weather gets colder.

Flared sleeve shirt refashion

I’ve always been a bit partial to a statement sleeve. And right now, flared sleeves, bell sleeves, and even gathered sleeves are just about everywhere.

I want to share with you a quick way to update an existing collared shirt, or any shirt for that matter. I started with a a basic white button up. Mine was purchased from Target for a grand total of $22, specifically with this project in mind. I toyed with the idea of sewing myself a shirt from scratch for all of five seconds. But as you should all know by now,  I’m not so in love with sewing basics.

fl6

I started by cutting the cuffs off a basic shirt and with them, about six inches of sleeve. I then measured the circumference of the cut portion of the sleeve and used that as a guide to draft the new cuff.

img_1653

I drafted a new cuff (just a big rectangle) that measured 8.5 inches in width and 12 inches in length (including a 5/8″ seam allowance). The cuff width allowed for a three inch overlap, to line it up with the underarm sleeve seam when sewn in place. I then slashed and spread the cuff to turn it into a flared design. See the picture of the new pattern piece (below) to get an idea of the amount of flare. The pattern piece is cut on the fold and two cuffs need to be cut (one for lining, one for outer fabric).

img_1654

Because of the size of these new cuffs, I chose not to interface them, which turned out to be the best decision. I also played around with the position of the overlap/slit of the cuff and found it worked best (appearance and practicality) when it was positioned on the underside, with the back overlapping the front. This positioning suits the natural movement of the arm better.

fl3

I’m delighted with my modified white shirt. I’m currently considering which other shirts in my wardrobe might need a similar update.

fl5

fl2

fl4

 

 

 

A silk button up and DIY distressed jeans

Once upon a time, this shirt pattern was an Archer. I’ve adjusted it quite a bit to fit, as well as switched out the cuff plackets for a more polished look. I also removed the back pleat. In this version, I introduced a covered front placket, lengthened the back hem, and left off the collar.

10

8

The fabric is silk crepe de chine. I was immediately drawn to the colour of it. I love silk CDC. It’s not difficult to sew, but it does take time and patience, especially when you start adding extra design features like cuffs, plackets and collars. I couldn’t use my standard shirt interfacings on a silk shirt like this, which was lightweight and slightly translucent. I needed an interfacing that wouldn’t be too stiff or visible through the fabric. I used beige silk organza (hand-basted in place) to interface the placket, cuffs, and collar band and it worked beautifully.

12

14

The white jeans were thrifted from an estate sale. They were too big around the waist but fit fine on the derriere (my standard issue with RTW jeans). The legs were also a looser, straight leg style, which unless I wanted to dive headfirst into a BH90210 episode, needed to be corrected immediately. I narrowed the waistband and the leg inseams. I also shortened the crotch a smidgen. I didn’t touch the outer leg seam because that would have twisted it around too far towards the front (and I was being lazy by skipping seam-ripping with this seam).

7

Lastly, I attacked the knees with a cheese grater. I went conservative on the DIY distressing because I’ve learnt from past experience that dressing quickly (which one always does if they have kids under eight) results in one’s feet being pushed through the distressed sections of jeans. These jeans will no doubt become more distressed as time progresses, which is kind of what I want anyway.

 

 

Leather wrap skirt

Remember the last wrap skirt I made? Well, not long after I made it, I spotted this Tibi skirt on Instagram. And as fortune would have it, I had just the right amount of (Perfection fused) leather leftover in my stash. I’m not exactly sure how this leather is made. It looks convincing but it definitely doesn’t compare to genuine lambskin. It is very affordable and easy to sew. The underside is fabric and the outer is leather. I find it doesn’t press/glue quite as neatly as the real stuff, but it is lightweight, quite fluid, and without flaws, which makes sewing with it very economical.

5

1

10

3

I used the same basic pattern as my last wrap skirt. It is a very simple modification on a pencil skirt (details here). However, this time I created a facing instead of a waistband and added a strap to wrap around my waist and tie secure at a silver ring. I didn’t line this skirt because the fabric backed leather didn’t require it.

This is a fun skirt. I’ll enjoy wearing it before the weather gets too cold. And later, I might have a go at layering it with jeans or skinny pants.

12

 

 

Grainline Archer // vintage sheet shirt

So, I loved Miss Seven’s vintage sheet shirt so much that I just had to make my own. Here it is.

7

3

6

My Grainline Archer has been modified to accommodate my standard broad back/long arm/height requirements. I also added a classic, tailored sleeve placket, and two fish eye darts in the back.