Category Archives: silk

Mito Cami Scrapbust

I’ve had this lovely Lisa Ho silk/cotton (from The Fabric Store) sitting in my stash for more than five years. There was only a little bit left, but I finally found the perfect project for it.

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I paired it with a remnant of silk satin to make the prettiest Mito Cami ever! The pattern is by Papercut Patterns. It’s a lovely, easy fitting cami and dress design. I can picture myself making up the dress version to slip over a swimsuit in Summer.

 

I didn’t have the strap hardware on hand to make my straps adjustable so I simply cut and stitched the desired length in place to suit me. I sewed¬† up a size Small, which reflected my bust measurement pretty much spot on. I didn’t have to deal with my shoulders because of the strappy design.

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Asaka Kimono in Peach Silk

I made my first Asaka Kimono years ago. I wear it daily in Summer as a morning robe. I LOVE it more than words can say, and for years, I’ve also been meaning to make a more “dressy” version of it.

When I saw this lovely double georgette silk from Pitt Trading, I knew immediately what I would make with it. 

The fabric is a beautiful weight, with a dry hand and lovely drape. It’s not exactly sheer, but it isn’t totally opaque either. I actually photographed most of these pictures without the slip. And if I was to wear this dress out in the evening, I could probably get away without the slip. However, if I was off to a daytime wedding, I’d definitely wear a nude slip.

I used to avoid sewing with sheer fabrics because I couldn’t figure out how to line them or what with. I’ve discovered that I much prefer to sew up sheer dresses and tops without a lining because it gives me more freedom to mix up the look of the final garment. I just pop a slip underneath it. Slips also get me out of trouble if I decide a linen I’ve sewn with is too sheer in the sunlight, or a skirt could do with a lining (post construction). I own three different types of slips, in nude, white, and black. I generally start with long dress slips and trim them down as required. If they get too short, I keep the short one and start on another long one. 

The Asaka Kimono pattern is a great pattern. It’s a little bit of a fabric hog and always takes me longer than I expect to sew. However, perhaps that’s because I’ve always tried to take a little extra care when I’ve sewn this pattern. French seams are a deserving feature when using a lovely fabric like this.

I’m super happy with how my new Asaka Kimono turned out. I can’t decide if I’ll wear it out first on a date night, or try layering it with black tights and a turtleneck to wear to work this weekend…

 

The All-Year-Round Dress

As soon as I saw this amazing fabric, I just knew I had to have it. It is a silk/cotton satin from The Fabric Store. The colours are bold, beautiful, and totally amazing. It handles a lot like a quilting cotton, with a similar, crisp hand, but with a beautiful, satin, surface sheen.

Obviously, I made a dress. However, I think it would also make a divine blazer or skirt. My dress is a self-drafted iteration of this one and this one. Over the years, I’ve managed to tweak a princess bodice design into a fit that is perfect for me. It’s easy enough for me to switch that base design up with different straps and skirts. I probably revisit that same pattern once or twice a year.

When I ordered this fabric online, I had two dress styles in mind. I just needed to get my hot little hands on the fabric first, to see which design would suit the drape of the fabric better. I also planned on making a turtleneck to wear under the dress in Winter. You’ve seen my turtleneck already. Funny how that shade of Ballet Pink perfectly complements this dress!

I love this dress a lot. The length is great. The pockets are fab. And the fabric is out of this world. It makes me smile every time I see it. I can’t wait to wear it layered in Winter, and on it’s own in Summer.

Kobe top in sheer silk

I’m a little obsessed with floaty, sheer fabrics right now. And in my world, that literally means all the silks. Liberty of London do an amazing crinkle silk which I’ve used before. I’m thinking about using it next time if I sew this pattern up as a dress. For this version, I used a divine silk georgette from The Fabric Store.

I only made a few small modifications to the pattern. I sewed up a size small which is quite close to my measurements. However, I know I have to adjust for my shoulders these days, even when the bust measurement matches perfectly.

The adjustment that works well for me is this. I draw a diagonal line from the middle of the shoulder seam to the CB of the bottom of the top (or very close to it). I slice along this line and spread the shoulder seam by about 5/8″. It generally keeps the waist the same size but adds width to top most shoulder area, which fits well with the triangular body shape that those of us with strong shoulders and lats have. I repeat with both sides, and the front and back of the top. If the top hangs well below waist level, or I am dealing with a dress, I cut the pattern off at the waist so as not to widen the waist or hip area.

My first attempt at the Kobe top turned out a little shorter in the front than I expected, even with just a narrow hem. I usually lengthen patterns in the bodice by 1/2 inch to account for my 5″10 frame. I didn’t in this case and I’m pleasantly surprised. It’s a little outside my comfort zone, but still like this top a LOT. I don’t mind the sliver of tummy. But I know this top would also pair perfectly with my high waisted jeans.

The back is sitting a little lower in the photos than I expected. I think I wear this top pushed back a little to raise the neckline. I’ve been wearing the top with a little cropped top/soft bra underneath in a complementary shade of apricot in real life to avoid the peek of bra underneath. I think it works.

 

 

Silk bias cut dress for Summer

When you find the perfect silk, you really just have to make the perfect dress. I actually had another dress in mind for this silk, but when it arrived on my doorstep, I realised that it deserved something a little better.

It’s a silk satin by Trina Turk from The Fabric Store. It has a lovely, subtle texture to the good side, and the fabric is a beautiful weight that doesn’t require lining. It’s the perfect silk for a bias cut dress!

I used a design I copied from a RTW dress a few years ago. However, I lined the front and back bodice and turned it into a halter neck instead.

 

I love this dress A LOT. And I should. It’s the perfect fit. I guess that’s why so many of us sew though, isn’t it. How amazing does it feel to slip on a dress that fits like a glove, custom-made to your unique shape only?

Liberty of London silk blouse

This is the type of top that I will live in for the next eight months. It’s super comfy, versatile, and smart enough to wear to work.

The fabric is a sandwashed crepe de chine silk by Liberty of London from The Fabric Store. It has the softest texture and prettiest print. I would sleep in this top if I thought it was appropriate.

The pattern I used is one I’ve used many times before. It’s a vintage pattern, McCalls 6429, originally designed as a raglan style dress. However, I’ve sewn it up as a jumpsuit and a dress. Last year, I refashioned the dress into a top and wore it nearly every day until it died. That’s why I decided to replicate it.

My only modifications (apart from cutting it as a top) was to add an extra 5/8″ to the width of the centre back and collar. I’m not sure this is the perfect “broad shoulder/back” adjustment, but I’d done it this way in the past for this pattern and it fits me well.

A Spring midi in crinkle silk

Spring is for floating around in dresses made of fairy wings, right?! I got a jump start on my favourite season with this dress. It might still be a little cool to wear it right now, but those days aren’t far away.

The fabric I used is Liberty of London silk crinkle chiffon from The Fabric Store. It’s a deliciously sheer silk that requires a bit of patience to sew, but produces a beautiful outcome.

I shouldn’t scare you though. It isn’t really that tricky to sew at all. The key is in keeping to a simple pattern and taking your time. Believe it or not, but the crinkle appearance and print also make it a very forgiving fabric to sew, particularly since it is a fabric that suits a looser fitting design.

I kept the design of this dress incredibly simple. The neckline and armscye are simply narrow hems. No binding. The silk presses beautifully. It’s a pullover style. The design is loosely based on a drop-waist dress pattern I made for myself years ago. I just turned the bodice into a high-low shape and added an extra gathered panel.

I’m wearing a simple black slip underneath. The only one I owned was tunic length, so I added a panel of leftover black lining (from this coat) to achieve the length I desired.

I love this dress! I’m envisioning a whole wardrobe of sheer dresses now. Stop me!