Tag Archives: diy fashion

Vogue 9186 in linen stripes

My second Fall project for 2018 is this linen dress. I love the oversized style of it!

I used Vogue pattern 9186 and a beautiful medium weight linen (Hampton Stripe) from Pitt Trading Fabrics in Australia (obviously they ship internationally ;-)). The fabric is truly beautiful. I think they may have sold out of this now, but I imagine it would have made a great pair of trousers or a blazer too. No lining required.

I altered this pattern a little. I did my usual broad shoulder adjustment at the shoulder seams. I took a photo this time too!

I also lengthened the hem by about 14 inches. This turned out to be a little too much on one side because of the asymmetrical nature of the dress. I ended up chopping off a corner and piecing the hem a little to create a more even hem, whilst still maintaining a good length.

I really LOVE the sleeves and placket and the fit and shape of the dress. I’m not so sure about the elastic casing at the waist. I loved the dress without, but there is excess fabric on one side of the dress to allow for the ruching. I sewed the elastic casing in and then unpicked most of it because I didn’t like the look. I don’t mind keeping just a little section on one side. I will sew this pattern again, but I’ll probably cut the front and back on the fold and ditch the elastic casing and extra fabric on the other side.

Burdastyle paper bag waist pants

This was one of those projects that I made at a completely inappropriate time. I made them about four months ago, just as the Winter weather was starting to kick in. I still haven’t worn them. It’s not because I don’t want to though. Loose linen pants just cannot be equated with a Kansas winter, inside or outside. It’s still far to cold to wear them (-11C today) but I can now see Spring on the horizon, which is possibly why I finally found the inspiration to take some photos. They will make the most delicious Spring pants ever!

Remember the military green shorts I made at the end of Summer? I used the same Burdastyle (111A) pattern for these. I made exactly the same adjustments, but just refined them a little. I shortened the top ruffle by about one inch. It was just a smidgen too high in the shorts. I love the drama of the shorts (and will still wear them) but a too high ruffle flops down a bit by the end of the day. Perhaps a bit of interfacing would help this out though.

Like the shorts, these are also made with beautiful milled linen from the Fabric Store. The shade of pink is so pretty. There’s a lot of pale pinks coming out in Spring RTW right now. Perhaps that’s influencing me a little with colours. I do like a good neutral though.

Honestly, I can’t remember if I lengthened these pants or not. I may have (I usually do with everything), but I do remember cutting off some at the end as well. I think the pattern is designed to be very long in the legs.

On another note, I haven’t really been in a position to sew much over the past six months but I think things are slowly changing. I purchased and printed an Oslo Coat last night. I’m hoping to get it taped up and ready to cut by the weekend. There’s a good three months of coat weather left here, so I I think I’ll sneak it in just in time. For my Australian friends, Spring in Kansas is generally colder than a Sydney Winter, with the odd bit of frost and occasional snow dustings.

After this, I’m planning on making the new dress pattern by Tessuti Fabrics. How lovely is the Claudia dress?! I was smitten the moment I saw this one. I’m hoping to find enough linen scraps in my stash. I have a feeling I may need to get a little creative though. What’s in your sewing queue? Are you still sewing for Winter (or Summer, my friends downunder)?

Spring stripes

When I purchase fabric, I usually have a project in mind, but I rarely follow sewing patterns without some sort of modification. This means that I’ve had to get pretty good at estimating fabric requirements on my own. I usually come pretty close these days, but sometimes I end up erring on the more generous side (because it gives me a little leeway to change my mind on the design, and because I know that I’ll always find a good use for the scraps if any remain).

This was the case with some lovely hand-dyed velvet, wool crepe, and ponte that I found in my stash. I loved the way the contrasting colours looked together. They all have some stretch, but not enough to do away with darts. The velvet and wool are woven, but the ponte was a knit.

I started by cutting the fabrics into wide strips (seaming some of the velvet strips for extra length where needed). Then I stitched them together to create a striped fabric. I had just enough fabric to make a midi skirt in a slim-fitting style. I designed it by draping (on myself!) and re-stitching those stripe seams around the hips and bottom until they absorbed the darts needed to create the fitted shape.

In retrospect, I should have left the initial (striped fabric) seams unfinished (no overlocking!) until I’d sewn the final garment. I ended up doing a lot of unpicking of those overlocked seams to shape the top of the skirt. I also added gores (of orange wool crepe) to the bottom of the skirt for a bit of extra flare.

There’s a bit of a difference in the amount of stretch in each fabric. So, even though the stripes are the same width, the white ponte stretches more than the velvet, and this is most apparent at the waist. I probably should have made the ponte a little narrower, or the velvet a little wider to adjust for this.

I’m still pretty happy with how it turned out though. It’s a warm and comfortable skirt for Spring. And it just so happens to match perfectly with my refashioned velvet top.

Vogue 9043 in classic black

This is my first coat of the season. I’m still debating with myself over whether I’ll sew another this year. I know there’s time. I have the fabric. There’s a few months of coat weather ahead of me here. I’m just not¬†entirely sure that I want to build further on my own Winter wardrobe this year, or perhaps wait until next year when I’ll definitely need it more.

Meanwhile, I’m glad to say that this little black coat is going to get a lot of wear. The pattern I used was Little Vogue 9043. I cut View B in a size 8 for my very tall seven year old. The black wool coating and silky vintage lining was all thrifted from estate sales, aquired several months earlier. The buttons were excrutiatingly picked out from Joann’s by the littlest sister, specifically for Miss Seven and this coat. In equal parts, they are the cheapest, and yet most expensive buttons I own, and yet so much selfless thought and true love went into their selection that I just couldn’t say no.

The size 8 fits Miss just-turned-Seven reasonably well right now, but at the rate she’s growing, I’m not convinced she’ll fit into it next year. Of all my girls, she’s probably built the most similar to me; tall and slim, with broad shoulders (great for swimming ;-)). She doesn’t measure up as a size 8 through the chest, but her shoulders are broader above this. I know (from personal fitting experience) that if I sew a pattern to fit her bust/chest measurement, the shoulders won’t fit without adjustment. An easy kid-fix is to simply size up, as I did with this coat. It fits her perfectly across the shoulders, but there is extra room through the chest area, and a lot more ease (than intended by the pattern design) at the waist and hips. There is also extra length in the coat, but that actually works well in our favour. The fit isn’t perfect, but it is perfectly acceptable for a child and a child’s Winter coat at that.

She’ll get a lot of wear out of this coat over the next three months. The wool coating is thick, but it’s probably still only best suited to Spring here. It would be a perfectly suitable coat for Winter in Australia though.

Before I sign off on this one, I should also mention the beautiful lines in the design of the pattern. It’s one of the reasons why I love Vogue patterns and why I was drawn to making this particular one. It’s a little hard to photograph the details in black fabric, but the pockets are integrated beautifully into a princess seamed bodice. The two-piece sleeves are also shaped so that they curve forward.

I love the classic, dressy shape of this coat. It will be a very nice coat to keep and hand down to the last daughter (assuming it survives the wear and tear of this middle child!).

Statement sleeves in blush silk

This has been my party shirt for the holiday season. I’ve mostly been wearing it with leather trousers, rather than these wool pants. There’s something so lovely and contradictory about pairing leather with silk charmeuse.

The pattern I used was Vogue 7604. The only changes I made were to lengthen the sleeves and body a little. I made my standard broad back adjustment. I also shortened the neck ties by about 6 inches on each side, because I simply didn’t have enough fabric. That bias cut collar and tie is a serious fabric hog!

There is a small amount of stretch in my silk (technically it’s called stretch silk charmeuse), which makes it very comfortable to wear. In real life, I’ve been wearing a thin, long sleeve, merino top underneath it, which makes it the warmest and most comfortable party wear ever!

The collar can be worn a few ways. I like it tied at the back best, but it can also be tied at the front, or wrapped around once with a shorter tie at the back. And suprisingly, those sleeves did not get dipped into any gravy. I did have to watch out for the pussy bow though!

A Summer dress

Apparently you guys like pretty dresses, well those of you who follow me on IG do. My top posts of 2016 are pretty much all the dresses. I hadn’t even blogged about this one and it still made the cut.

I made this one using a large remnant of vintage linen, thrifted from an estate sale. The textured windowpane fabric was from a small length purchased on whim from Tessuti Fabrics some time ago. I think the blue pairs perfectly with it.

The pattern is modification on a self-drafted princess bodice that fits me perfectly. You’ve seen me use different versions of this bodice all Summer (here, here, here, and here). The skirt is just gathered (with pockets of course!). I was after a cool, easy-to-wear, Summer dress.

I was worried about the straps being too stiff, but I’m glad for their sturdiness now. And they don’t feel too stiff when I wear the dress. They actually feel comfortable and secure. I hate flimsy straps that feel like they may stretch out or tear. Instead of creating tubes and pressing flat (as I’d normally do for a strap of this width), I used wider lengths of linen, folded the raw edges in and then in on themselves again, and then topstitched both edges. It means that there are four layers of linen in each strap, perfectly suited to holding up the weight of a midi-length, gathered skirt.

I’m a big fan of the midi length dress. It’s an easy length for tall ladies to wear. I know I’m going to get a lot of wear out of this, maybe even sooner rather than later!

Vogue 8952 – View B in a linen knit

I don’t like sewing staples very much. However, I had a bit of linen jersey in my stash and thought it might make a nice top for Fall.

I used Vogue 8952, and made View B in a size 12.

I made a few very small changes to the pattern:

  • I narrowed the waist/hip flare.
  • I *think* I shortened it a little too. I wanted a simple, long sleeved top rather than a flared (borderline) tunic.
  • I lengthened the sleeves by an inch.
  • I also attached the funnel neck a little differently. I doubled it over, rather than leaving it as a single hemmed piece. I didn’t want quite so much drape around my neck.

I don’t mind the way this top turned out. It’s not perfect, but it is perfectly wearable. The neckline is more stretched out in my top than what you’d normally see (even though I did stabilise it). I should have adjusted for my broad shoulders/back (as I would normally do if I were sewing a woven fabric). The neck seam should probably sit a little further in towards my neck on each side. However, I knew that the type of knit I was using, and the wide nature of the neckline would be very forgiving to broad shoulders. And it is comfortable to wear so I can deal with it.