Tag Archives: flounce

Simplicity 1435 // A quickie Summer dress for Miss Three

I’ve made this pattern more times than I care to remember. It’s a very simple style that is both comfortable and practical. It whips together very quickly and always becomes a favourite.

I made the sleeveless version this time. I bound the neck and armscye in my own way, with my own self-made binding, but only because I didn’t bother to look at the pattern cover to see that the pattern also included this view, and therefore would have included binding in the pattern pieces had I chosen to look.

 

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So, it seems that my little one hasn’t changed a great deal since I first made this pattern up for her. We’re still on a size 3. I’m sure she has grown a little bit taller, but she doesn’t sprout up at the ferocity of her bigger sisters. She truly is my little one.

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The fabric I used for this dress is French terry, which is thicker and less fluid than what I’ve used before. I would have thought that this would have made for a closer fit, but it seems not. In general, I find that the sleeved versions of this dress are a lot more forgiving (and flattering) with fit.

This version (sans sleeves) is clearly comfy, but the wider fit through the shoulder seams (as required to fit the sleeves) isn’t the most flattering design. I’ll keep making it though. My favourite part of the dress is the complete lack of closures, which facilitates independent dressing, and lets me enjoy my morning cup of tea in peace.

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Tutorial // adding a flounce to the Wonderland Skirt

And here it is. Apparently I’m not the only one who’s had the idea of turning the gathered section of the Wonderland skirt into a flounce. I’m going to show you how to do it. It’s a very simple modification once you know what to expect.

1. Fit and sew the yoke (in it’s entirety). The design of the yoke is very, very subtly A-line. It’s possible to peg it in a little, but be sure to record those changes on your pattern pieces first, so you can draft your flounce correctly.

2. Once you have the yoke fitting as you’d like, you are ready to draft the flounce. On the bottom of the back and front yoke pieces, draw in the 5/8 inch (16mm) seam allowances (I’ve used red in the diagram) for the bottom and the centre back (CB) of the back yoke. There’s no need to worry about the centre front (CF) on the front yoke because it was cut on the fold (without a seam allowance).

3. On a large piece of paper, trace the bottom seam allowance (in red) of the yoke. This will become the top seam line of the flounce. It makes sense that you’d want the top of your flounce to be exactly the same length as the bottom of the yoke because you will want your seams to match up when you sew them. Wonderland flounce2-01

Pay attention to the CB and CF seam allowance. In the original pattern, the Front Yoke is cut on the fold. The Back Yoke is cut as two pieces. If you want to cut the back skirt on the fold too, you will need to subtract 5/8 inch (16mm) from the red line you draw. This might depend on how wide your fabric is.

4. Line the ruler up with the bottom of the yoke and use it as a guide to smoothly extend the side seams and CB/CF seams of your flounce. Imagine you are just making the yoke longer. Decide how long you want the flounce to be and extend the side seam and the CB/CF seams all by the same amounts. My flounce is about 14 inches long (but this might still come to below the knee on some).

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4. Draw in the bottom of the flounce. Try to mimic the curve at the top of the flounce and measure along the way so that the entire flounce is the same length. It’s also a good time to draw in the top seam allowance (then join it up with the side seams – I haven’t joined mine up in the diagram). Also make some markings on the pattern pieces (they are a bit oddly shaped so do this before you forget).

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If you attached the pieces you have just drawn, you would have a straight (ever so slightly A-line) extension of the yoke. However, we want a flounce, so now we need to add some flare. You can add as much or as little flare as you like. I’m going to show you what I did.

5. Use a ruler to draw two straight lines, vertically down the flounce pieces, to make a division of three. Space them an even distance apart, but you don’t need to measure.

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6. Now you are going to slash and spread those lines to create a flounce. Cut along the black lines from the bottom to the top, BUT stop just before you cut through the top. The top will be your pivot point.

Place some paper underneath your pieces and spread them by as much as you want. I spread each slash by about 1.5 inches (16mm). You could spread them by more than this or add an extra slash to make your flounce more dramatic. Tape the spread pattern pieces onto the paper. Because of the curved shape of the yoke, the front and back flounces will look quite different.

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7. Draw in smooth curves for the top and bottom of your flounce pieces.

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Congratulations! You now have flounce pattern pieces that will perfectly fit the yoke of your skirt.

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Gladiator arms

Hiding beneath the bows and dangles of this top is actually a design that I’m perfectly happy with. I love the uneven hem and the interesting back. I like the shape of the neckline and the back yoke buttons.

I’m not so sure about the turbo-boosters. But it was a lot of fun experimenting. And you all know how much I like to experiment. It’s the thing I like most about sewing. There isn’t really anything you can’t do with fabric, even if it doesn’t always work.

My first idea was shoulder bows. I don’t dislike them. But they don’t suit broad shoulders like mine. I think they’d look pretty on a pear shape, for a special date.

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For a bit of fun, I tried some gladiator arms. Now this is a trend I could push… if I was seventeen or Leandra Medine.

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This top is still very wearable for me. In real life, I think I’ll leave my turbo boosters hanging, a little bit like drifting seaweed, I guess. The fabric is beautiful though and can let me get away with almost anything. It’s the same gorgeous striped linen that I used in my Wonderland Skirt.

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I’m going to work a little more on finessing the design and fit of the top underneath. It’s my attempt at coming up with a more wearable version of this white linen tunic and I like it best kept simple. I’m listening though. If you do like the bows and gladiator arms, speak now, or forever hold your peace.

Seeing double: Simplicity 1435

Simplicity 1435 is my go-to kid pattern for easy knit dresses. I’ve made it a few times already for my littlest peep. This time I really stretched myself and whipped one up for Miss Five too. The fabric I used is a very drapey viscose knit. The fabric is quite heavy so it does drag the dresses down a little at the waist, but I’m fond of a drop waist anyway, and I just love those stripes.

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These two girls are little peas in a pod. I spoke not a word during this photo shoot. It’s quite hilarious to watch them getting flowers for props and posing together.

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Every time I make a dress using this pattern, it always becomes a firm favourite with Miss Three and I know why. Fuss free knit dresses are so comfortable. She can dress and undress easily as there are no fastenings and the layered skirt provides just the right amount of swish-factor.

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Simplicity 1435 is a very simple pattern, a super quick make, and very practical for everyday wear. There’s nothing perfect about these versions. I whipped them up so quickly that the stripes aren’t precisely matched, but I know they will be worn to shreds. I just wish the little one would decide to like this dress too (which I think is utterly adorable), which hangs forlornly and completely ignored in her cupboard.