Tag Archives: silk

Lois Dress in Silk CDC

Pattern: Lois Dress from Tessuti Fabrics. I sewed a size 12 through the top bodice and graded down to an 8 through the hips, according to my body measurements. The pattern itself is precise. My grading estimates were not. I started sizing down a little high up in the dress and the result is it fits too tight through my rib cage where the seam is. I added two back wedges to help out a bit. The fit is pretty snug but too difficult to get on and off. I’d love to sew this dress up again but will add some more width and length to it next time.

Fabric: A beautiful silk crepe de chine from The Fabric Store. It is lightweight but not see-through, making this the perfect Summer fabric.

Merino Knit Scrapbust and Ivory Silk Sleeves

Top Pattern: Blend of Papercut Rise and Fall Turtleneck and Thread Theory’s Strathcona Henley. I posted more details on the modifications here. In this version, I shortened and flared the sleeves. I also shortened the body and added a waistband.

Fabric: Premium merino knits (195gsm) from The Fabric Store. Ivory sandwashed silk for the sleeves in version two, also from The Fabric Store.

Mito Cami Scrapbust

I’ve had this lovely Lisa Ho silk/cotton (from The Fabric Store) sitting in my stash for more than five years. There was only a little bit left, but I finally found the perfect project for it.

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I paired it with a remnant of silk satin to make the prettiest Mito Cami ever! The pattern is by Papercut Patterns. It’s a lovely, easy fitting cami and dress design. I can picture myself making up the dress version to slip over a swimsuit in Summer.

 

I didn’t have the strap hardware on hand to make my straps adjustable so I simply cut and stitched the desired length in place to suit me. I sewed¬† up a size Small, which reflected my bust measurement pretty much spot on. I didn’t have to deal with my shoulders because of the strappy design.

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Asaka Kimono in Peach Silk

I made my first Asaka Kimono years ago. I wear it daily in Summer as a morning robe. I LOVE it more than words can say, and for years, I’ve also been meaning to make a more “dressy” version of it.

When I saw this lovely double georgette silk from Pitt Trading, I knew immediately what I would make with it. 

The fabric is a beautiful weight, with a dry hand and lovely drape. It’s not exactly sheer, but it isn’t totally opaque either. I actually photographed most of these pictures without the slip. And if I was to wear this dress out in the evening, I could probably get away without the slip. However, if I was off to a daytime wedding, I’d definitely wear a nude slip.

I used to avoid sewing with sheer fabrics because I couldn’t figure out how to line them or what with. I’ve discovered that I much prefer to sew up sheer dresses and tops without a lining because it gives me more freedom to mix up the look of the final garment. I just pop a slip underneath it. Slips also get me out of trouble if I decide a linen I’ve sewn with is too sheer in the sunlight, or a skirt could do with a lining (post construction). I own three different types of slips, in nude, white, and black. I generally start with long dress slips and trim them down as required. If they get too short, I keep the short one and start on another long one. 

The Asaka Kimono pattern is a great pattern. It’s a little bit of a fabric hog and always takes me longer than I expect to sew. However, perhaps that’s because I’ve always tried to take a little extra care when I’ve sewn this pattern. French seams are a deserving feature when using a lovely fabric like this.

I’m super happy with how my new Asaka Kimono turned out. I can’t decide if I’ll wear it out first on a date night, or try layering it with black tights and a turtleneck to wear to work this weekend…

 

Liberty of London silk blouse

This is the type of top that I will live in for the next eight months. It’s super comfy, versatile, and smart enough to wear to work.

The fabric is a sandwashed crepe de chine silk by Liberty of London from The Fabric Store. It has the softest texture and prettiest print. I would sleep in this top if I thought it was appropriate.

The pattern I used is one I’ve used many times before. It’s a vintage pattern, McCalls 6429, originally designed as a raglan style dress. However, I’ve sewn it up as a jumpsuit and a dress. Last year, I refashioned the dress into a top and wore it nearly every day until it died. That’s why I decided to replicate it.

My only modifications (apart from cutting it as a top) was to add an extra 5/8″ to the width of the centre back and collar. I’m not sure this is the perfect “broad shoulder/back” adjustment, but I’d done it this way in the past for this pattern and it fits me well.

A Spring midi in crinkle silk

Spring is for floating around in dresses made of fairy wings, right?! I got a jump start on my favourite season with this dress. It might still be a little cool to wear it right now, but those days aren’t far away.

The fabric I used is Liberty of London silk crinkle chiffon from The Fabric Store. It’s a deliciously sheer silk that requires a bit of patience to sew, but produces a beautiful outcome.

I shouldn’t scare you though. It isn’t really that tricky to sew at all. The key is in keeping to a simple pattern and taking your time. Believe it or not, but the crinkle appearance and print also make it a very forgiving fabric to sew, particularly since it is a fabric that suits a looser fitting design.

I kept the design of this dress incredibly simple. The neckline and armscye are simply narrow hems. No binding. The silk presses beautifully. It’s a pullover style. The design is loosely based on a drop-waist dress pattern I made for myself years ago. I just turned the bodice into a high-low shape and added an extra gathered panel.

I’m wearing a simple black slip underneath. The only one I owned was tunic length, so I added a panel of leftover black lining (from this coat) to achieve the length I desired.

I love this dress! I’m envisioning a whole wardrobe of sheer dresses now. Stop me!