Tag Archives: Tessuti patterns

Lois Dress in Silk CDC

Pattern: Lois Dress from Tessuti Fabrics. I sewed a size 12 through the top bodice and graded down to an 8 through the hips, according to my body measurements. The pattern itself is precise. My grading estimates were not. I started sizing down a little high up in the dress and the result is it fits too tight through my rib cage where the seam is. I added two back wedges to help out a bit. The fit is pretty snug but too difficult to get on and off. I’d love to sew this dress up again but will add some more width and length to it next time.

Fabric: A beautiful silk crepe de chine from The Fabric Store. It is lightweight but not see-through, making this the perfect Summer fabric.

Evie Bias Cut skirt and Ogden Cami

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Fabric: Part diamond viscose crepe from The Fabric Store

Patterns:

Evie bias skirt  by Tessuti Fabrics

Sewn in a straight size 8. No modifications other than I used 2cm elastic and folded the edge. Elastic waist view.

Ogden Cami by True Bias

Sewn in a straight size 8. Lengthened by 1 inch.

White linen top previously made here.

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Claudia dress in linen stripes

Here is my Claudia dress in beautiful, striped linen/cotton from The Fabric Store.

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I sewed the pattern up in a straight size S, with no adjustments to length. I based my size selection off my bust/chest size. I could possibly size down next time, but I honestly don’t mind the easy fit of this dress. I feel like the design intends it to be loose.

In mostly plan to wear this dress over a white tee. However, I’ll also wear it as a swimsuit cover up in Summer.

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A Yuki Dress in Rayon Crepe

Sometimes I want to wear an easy dress in Winter. I have a bunch of fitted dresses that I can layer for cool weather. And I do. I wear turtlenecks and tights under many of my classic, fit and flare dresses. However, I love loose, floaty dresses too. I have several simple, shift-style dresses that I love to wear in Summer, but none for Winter. The Yuki Dress fit this wardrobe gap perfectly for me.

I used the Yuki pattern from Tessuti Fabrics. I made it up directly from the envelope. My body traverses three sizes in their patterns but because of the style of dress, (and to keep things simple), I chose the largest part of my body (bust) and selected my size in accordance with that. The dress is quite roomy through the body. I will probably grade the sides down a little next time.

I toyed with lengthening the dress. I normally lengthen everything I make (I’m 5″10). However, the pattern pieces seemed long to me when I was laying them out, and I wouldn’t have minded this style of dress being a little shorter. It did turn out quite long. It may be a little longer due to my choice of hem. I did a narrow hem on my dress, but I couldn’t tell you what the instructions ask for in this respect.

The fabric I used was a lovely rayon crepe in navy from The Fabric Store. It’s a gorgeous colour in real life, but like black, so hard to photograph to show details. I had to overexpose the above photo which makes the fabric look sheerer than it really is. I would love to make this dress up again in a wool crepe, a heavyweight cream linen, or perhaps a heavy silk satin. It’s a lovely pattern.

I’ve already worn this dress quite a bit. It’s a stylish, yet easy to wear piece that I can easily wear to work with a turtleneck and tights. I’m looking forward to sewing this one again one day!

Megan longline cardi in striped merino jersey

I’ve made the Megan longline cardigan before. It’s a super easy make that is also an extremely practical addition to a transeasonal wardrobe.

For this version, I used a beautiful, striped merino jersey from The Fabric Store. It looks like my stripes might be sold out but there are other options that are equally as beautiful. It’s a lovely weight fabric for layering, or for wearing alone in Fall. I love merino jersey because it is soft and comfy to wear. It’s warm! And very importantly, it launders well.

With a few exceptions (coating fabrics, dry clean only plans), I wash all my fabric hard (on hot) and put them in the dryer (on hot) before sewing with them. I do this to make sure there’s no chance of future shrinkage or change when my finished garments accidentally get thrown in the dryer in the future. I’ll usually still try to gently wash my “nice” finished garments, but I know at some point they’ll all end up in the dryer, accidentally or not. I’ve learnt from experience that life gets in the way of garment care in my house. I’ve also found that if I choose quality fabrics, they are usually tougher than you imagine. I sew day-to-day clothes using plenty of silk, linen, wool, and cotton. I haven’t (nor have my washing helpers) destroyed a single fabric yet!

But back to this great cardi. I made very few modifications. I lengthened it by a few inches (3-4 inches for the hem and 1-2 inches for the sleeves). I also cut the back piece as one, and widened the shoulder seams to accommodate my swimmer shoulders. My binding is a little wider than the pattern suggests. I just went with the width that I thought would look better for this striped pattern.

I know I will get a lot of wear out of this great cardi. Merino knit is probably one of my favourite fabrics to wear in Winter and Fall.

A black silk cami

I was given a few lengths of some lovely crepe backed silk satin recently after my MIL had a big clean out. The fabric is probably quite old, but it is in perfect condition and of a beautiful quality. The smaller remnant was a gorgeous glossy black and I knew that it would make the perfect camisole.

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Crepe back satin is much heavier in weight than charmeuse, with the lovely brilliance of satin on one side, and a dull, pebbly appearance on the underside. Normally, I’d prefer silk charmeuse for a slip or cami, but going into Fall, I knew this beefier silk would work well for layering over shirts, as well as wearing alone.

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The pattern I used was the Camilla Camisole pattern. I made up a straight size 10 but lengthened it by about 1 inch. It is perfect. This is the third Camilla Cami I’ve sewn. I love this pattern. It stands out from the crowd because it is cut on the bias, which gives it an elegant fit that can easily be translated into both formal and day wear.

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I made my first Camilla Cami in a Japanese poly and literally wore it to death a few Summers ago. I’ve recently started wearing my second version a lot more. I like the way it layers over a nice tee. And now, this classic black version is going to end up as another staple of my Fall wardrobe. I keep meaning to lengthen the pattern into a slip dress, but I find these little tops much more versatile, and great for using up small lengths of pretty silk.

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White Esthers and a knit raglan

There’s never any fabric waste in my house, especially when it’s something as lovely as this Saratoga knit by O! Jolly!. I only had the tiniest amount left after finishing my Megan longline cardigan, but I knew exactly what I wanted to do with it.

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I used the raglan view of V8952 as a base for the top. I made a few fit modifications, raised the neckline, and added my own neck and hem bands. I used some plain white ponte for the back and sleeves, and seamed together three scraps of Saratoga knit for the front. I love the texture of the spongy knit as a feature and the contrast of cream against white.

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The shorts are an old favourite and TNT for me. I used the Esther shorts pattern and simply added an asymmetrical overlay at the front. I used scraps for this make too. I salvaged some gorgeous, meaty Theory cotton sateen (from this dress) to use for the back of the shorts and for the front overlay. The dress was tired (with a few stains) and needed to be retired. I didn’t have quite enough sateen though, so I used some scrap linen for the shorts front and overlay lining. The linen was too lightweight for the shorts on its own, but perfect for this design where the front is layered.

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I’ll wear these shorts a lot. I made a yellow version a few  years ago which are still on the go, but have been downgraded to gardening/painting gear. It feels good to replace a wardrobe item that was very much loved.