Tag Archives: tutorial

Let’s talk darts

I’d like to spend a little time talking about darts. We’ve all sewn them at one time or another. They’re not difficult to sew and there are probably many ways to do them. I’m by no means an expert and I can’t promise that I won’t have any dart disasters in the future. I just know what I like and what I don’t. So I’m going to share a few pictures that I’ve come across lately that got me thinking about this topic in the first place. And then I’ll show you a little trick that I keep in mind when I sew darts.

Exhibit 1: This interesting jacket by Noon by Noor. It’s a sneak peak of their upcoming collection that they shared on Instagram. I usually love seeing their designs, but I just can’t look past those darts. Am I missing something here? Maybe they are a design feature? All I can see is that they are oddly positioned for this girl and stretched out like nipples.

On set of our Pre-Fall 2016 shoot #noonbynoor #pf16 #bts #sneakpeek #details

Exhibit 2: Dart-gate. Prada allowed poor Anne Hathaway to wear this dress a few years ago. Those dart lines are so straight. They’re like a big sign pointing to her nipples. Although, when I started sewing, this was how I sewed all my bust darts, because that was what the pattern said to do. I think there’s a better way.

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Exhibit 3: This recent pattern from Seamwork. I’m including this shot because it’s a problem I often face as a smaller busted lady and I particularly dislike the look of darts on an unfitted top. I feel like the whole point of darts is to shape a curve and when there is already excess ease, that shaping is unnecessary and unattractive. This woman is clearly too small and perky for the size of blouse. She could probably do without the darts completely. I’m not going to comment on the odd shape of them. I suspect the fabric may have been quite tricky/slippery to sew with.

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So, here is my quick and very simple tip for sewing darts.
My pet peeve is seeing darts end in a sharp or stretched out point on either a bodice or a bottom (in a skirt/pant). And that generally happens when you sew the dart straight, as indicated by the lines on most sewing patterns. But who has straight angles on their body? I’d hardly call myself curvy, but even I don’t have sharp angles on my body. Women are all about curves; gentle curves, big curves, medium curves, all kinds of curves. So why on earth would you sew straight seams when you’re supposed to be shaping around a curve (eg. bust or bottom).
In the diagram below, I’ve illustrated a skirt dart. The straight line is in black, in the shape you’d see marked on most patterns. The red line is the way I prefer to sew darts, curved around until it blends seamlessly with the fabric (because my bottom is round, not pointy). Obviously, to improve the fit further, you could also shorten/lengthen or shape the dart to reflect your own curves. But if you are just starting out and the bare minimum you do is to curve that seam, you will still have a much better end result. And if you want more information on sewing darts, you should check out this tutorial.
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Tutorial // adding a flounce to the Wonderland Skirt

And here it is. Apparently I’m not the only one who’s had the idea of turning the gathered section of the Wonderland skirt into a flounce. I’m going to show you how to do it. It’s a very simple modification once you know what to expect.

1. Fit and sew the yoke (in it’s entirety). The design of the yoke is very, very subtly A-line. It’s possible to peg it in a little, but be sure to record those changes on your pattern pieces first, so you can draft your flounce correctly.

2. Once you have the yoke fitting as you’d like, you are ready to draft the flounce. On the bottom of the back and front yoke pieces, draw in the 5/8 inch (16mm) seam allowances (I’ve used red in the diagram) for the bottom and the centre back (CB) of the back yoke. There’s no need to worry about the centre front (CF) on the front yoke because it was cut on the fold (without a seam allowance).

3. On a large piece of paper, trace the bottom seam allowance (in red) of the yoke. This will become the top seam line of the flounce. It makes sense that you’d want the top of your flounce to be exactly the same length as the bottom of the yoke because you will want your seams to match up when you sew them. Wonderland flounce2-01

Pay attention to the CB and CF seam allowance. In the original pattern, the Front Yoke is cut on the fold. The Back Yoke is cut as two pieces. If you want to cut the back skirt on the fold too, you will need to subtract 5/8 inch (16mm) from the red line you draw. This might depend on how wide your fabric is.

4. Line the ruler up with the bottom of the yoke and use it as a guide to smoothly extend the side seams and CB/CF seams of your flounce. Imagine you are just making the yoke longer. Decide how long you want the flounce to be and extend the side seam and the CB/CF seams all by the same amounts. My flounce is about 14 inches long (but this might still come to below the knee on some).

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4. Draw in the bottom of the flounce. Try to mimic the curve at the top of the flounce and measure along the way so that the entire flounce is the same length. It’s also a good time to draw in the top seam allowance (then join it up with the side seams – I haven’t joined mine up in the diagram). Also make some markings on the pattern pieces (they are a bit oddly shaped so do this before you forget).

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If you attached the pieces you have just drawn, you would have a straight (ever so slightly A-line) extension of the yoke. However, we want a flounce, so now we need to add some flare. You can add as much or as little flare as you like. I’m going to show you what I did.

5. Use a ruler to draw two straight lines, vertically down the flounce pieces, to make a division of three. Space them an even distance apart, but you don’t need to measure.

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6. Now you are going to slash and spread those lines to create a flounce. Cut along the black lines from the bottom to the top, BUT stop just before you cut through the top. The top will be your pivot point.

Place some paper underneath your pieces and spread them by as much as you want. I spread each slash by about 1.5 inches (16mm). You could spread them by more than this or add an extra slash to make your flounce more dramatic. Tape the spread pattern pieces onto the paper. Because of the curved shape of the yoke, the front and back flounces will look quite different.

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7. Draw in smooth curves for the top and bottom of your flounce pieces.

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Congratulations! You now have flounce pattern pieces that will perfectly fit the yoke of your skirt.

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