Tag Archives: wrap

Reversible wool cardi wrap

The great thing about double faced wool is that you can completely hide the seams for a neat finish. After you pull apart both sides of the fabric, you can fold them in on themselves and stitch in place. A concise picture of the process is here. It’s the perfect fabric to create a reversible cardi wrap like this. You can revisit the sewing tutorial here.

5

3

2

 

DIY draped cardi wrap

Firstly, I want to send out a big thank-you to everybody who commented on the coat in my last post. I hope you realise how much I love to read them all. I’m afraid to admit that sewing trumps replying on occasion (oh, and it probably trumps kids too at times… is that bad?). However, I’ll always do my best to answer any question thrown my way – anything to encourage and inspire people who sew! 

Now we can talk about this garment. I’m actually not sure what to call it. It’s not really a cardi, or a poncho, or a wrap for that matter. It’s really just a big rectangle with holes, but it does make for such a nice Winter cover up. I’m going to call it a wrap.

The idea for this wrap came from a gorgeous cashmere RTW cardi I tried on recently. It looked amazing on. I twirled in front of the mirror a few times before I realised exactly what it was… a giant rectangle and nothing more. So I held it up to my body, took a few mental measurements, and went home to make it myself.

7 10 6

I didn’t have any cashmere on hand. A stable wool knit would have worked beautifully but I didn’t have that either. What I did have was a very large length of pure wool cream suiting that I’d picked up from a garage sale for just 50 cents (it was discounted from the original price of 75 cents – bargain!). I could see that the fold lines of the fabric were discoloured with dust and light (with a few tiny holes in those areas as well) so my plan was to wash it quite aggressively when I got it home. I knew the hot wash and dryer would change the texture of the wool, but I was ok with that because a wool suiting, once felted by the washing machine, is still quite lovely and perfect for casual loungewear and kids clothes. As expected, the wool ended up with a very slightly fuzzier texture than before. It’s not actually fuzzy, but it no longer has the sleek, smooth feel of a suiting anymore. A by-product of the aggressive pre-washing also means that the fabric is now machine washable, dryer friendly, and pretty indestructible.

3

But, let’s get back to the making of this wrap. The two diagrams below should be all you need to make your own. It’s the easiest sew up ever!

STEP 1: Measure your fabric according to the instructions below.

wrap tutorial

The length of fabric I used was 180 cm, or approximately my height. For the width, I measured from my mid-section (mid-sternum) to the tip of my fingers. My chest width was measured in the front, from shoulder point to shoulder point.

My fabric was a woven, with no give at all, so I used 11 inches for my armscye gaps. In a knit, I’d probably shrink them a little to have them fit closer to the body. If I had bigger pippies, I could have easily increased the width of the armscye.

The centre line is where the seam line needs to be, and where you need to leave holes for the arms. To make a longer wrap (ie. to fall below the hips), you could widen the bottom panel. Keeping the top panel the same would maintain the original front drape.

STEP 2: Sew the two pieces of fabric together, wrong sides facing, and leaving gaps at the two positions you marked as the armscye. (The stitches are represented by the dotted line below.) And that’s pretty much it.

wrap tut 1

The last thing you need to do is finish the raw edges nicely. If you chose a fabric that doesn’t fray (like boiled or felted wool, or some jerseys) you could leave the edges raw and just reinforce the stitches around the armscye. The RTW version I fell in love with had been narrowly hemmed on an overlocker. Because I was dealing with a woven, I double turned all my edges and sewed a narrow hem. It would also be possible to bind the edges for a pretty contrast.

11

I’ve been wearing mine loose as well as belted. It’s hard to believe that such a simple rectangle can be transformed into a cool Winter outfit! Let me know if you decide to make one. And if you’re on IG, I’d love it if you tagged me (@lilysageandco).

5 4 1

 

 

 

 

 

Review // Blue Suede Shoes

Note: I received these shoes for free from Rhea Footwear in exchange for a review on my blog. I selected the shoes myself, and of course, the opinions here are all my own.

When Rhea Footwear contacted me to review their shoes, I’ll confess that I had no idea who they were. I definitely had to do a bit of research before I agreed to the collaboration. First and foremost, I wanted to make sure that their products were relevant to me (and therefore this blog). I’d consider shoes to be a very valid consideration when styling an outfit.

I selected the Classic Flats in sapphire blue and had a lot of fun pairing them with a few of my handmade outfits. I think they go very well with my husband’s ratty old Thread Theory Henley and my favourite leather blocked leggings (which I recently pegged and cropped for a more skinny pant look). They’d also look fabulous with skinny jeans or a midi skirt.

5

4

7

There were also some cute booties, flip flops, and men’s shoes on the Rhea Footwear website, but these blue suede shoes were the ones that caught my eye. I’ve been pleasantly surprised at how much I like them. They’re a little bit dressier than my go-to gold Vans, but equally as comfy. I’ve taken them on a test run to do the school pick up, and by school pick up, I mean a 3mile fast-walk/half-jog alongside a kid on a scooter and another on a bike. The soles feel quite cushioned and the leather wasn’t uncomfortably stiff (as new shoes can be). They feel a little narrower than the sneaker slip-ons I’m used to wearing but not in a bad way. I’m sure the suede will continue to mould to my feet as I keep wearing them.

So what makes Rhea Footwear different? All their shoes are designed to be stylish and functional at the same time. They use a signature anti-slip tread to prevent slipping and sliding when walking on ice and other wet surfaces. I probably wouldn’t have cared much in Sydney, but in Kansas, I LOVE the idea of a non-slip sole, particularly since I’m pretty much like Bambi as soon as the ground freezes. The suede is also treated to be water resistant and remain spot free, which makes sense if you plan to wear them in damp conditions.

It’s been a little dry here lately so I haven’t had a chance to test out the slip factor, but I’m sure I will over the next few months. It will be nice to have a slip on alternative to snow boots when I’m dashing out for a quick errand in Winter.

Meanwhile, here is the last look I put together. I’m wearing a white ponte knit playsuit that I made eons ago, paired with a vintage throw I picked up at an estate sale over Summer. I saw blankets and ponchos being worn a lot in the Southern Hemisphere over Winter so I thought I might give it a try too. What can I say…I’m wearing blue suede shoes and a granny throw. If that isn’t a bit of fun fashion, then what is!

15

12

10